Ch. 20 21 True/False

Helpfulness: 0
Set Details Share
created 6 years ago by jeandoesntknow
20,920 views
show moreless
Page to share:
Embed this setcancel
COPY
code changes based on your size selection
Size:
X
Show:
1

Cellular ingestion and destruction of particulate matter is called phagocytosis.

T

2

The respiratory burst produced by some macrophages releases free radicals.

T

3

The directional movement of cells in response to chemicals is called chemotaxis.

T

4

Fever is seldom beneficial because it speeds up the cellular metabolic rate and will not allow antigen-antibody reactions to occur.

F

5

Virus infected cells secrete complement to "warn" other cells of the presence of virus.

F

6

The classical complement pathway involves antibodies.

T

7

Substances capable of triggering the adaptive immune system and provoking an immune response are called antigens.

T

8

Some immunocompetent cells will never be called to service in our lifetime.

T

9

Adaptive immunity is provided only by lymphocytes that secrete antibodies.

F

10

Adaptive immunity is provided only by lymphocytes that secrete antibodies.

T

11

It is our genes, not antigens, that determine what specific foreign substances our immune system will be able to recognize and resist.

T

12

Soluble proteins secreted by plasma cells are called antibodies.

T

13

Antibodies cn act both intracellularly and extracellularly.

T

14

The mechanism of the "lethal hit" of cytotoxic T cells and NK cells involves a protein called perforin.

T

15

A given pathogen will provoke either a cell-mediated response or an antibody-mediated response but not both.

T

16

Monoclonal antibodies can be specific for several antigenic determinants.

F

17

Both T cells and B cells must accomplish double recognition: They must simultaneously recognize self and nonself to be activated.

T

18

Anaphylactic shock can result from an immediate hypersensitivity where the allergen enters the blood.

T

19

A transfusion reaction is a subacute hypersensitivity to foreign red blood cells.

T

20

The thymus functions strictly in maturation of T cells.

T

21

The lymphatic capillaries function to absorb the excess protein-containing interstitial fluid and return it to the bloodstream.

T

22

Lymphatic capillaries are permeable to proteins.

T

23

Digested fats are absorbed from the intestine by the lymph capillaries.

T

24

Chyle is delivered to the blood via the lymphatic system.

T

25

About 3 liters of fluid are lost to the tissue spaces every 24 hours and are returned to the bloodstream as lymph.

T

26

Because lymph vessels are very low-pressure conduits, movements of adjacent tissues are important in propelling lymph through the lymphatics.

T

27

When tissues are inflamed, lymphatic capillaries develop openings that permit uptake of large particles such as cell debris, pathogens, and cancer cells.

T

28

The cisterna chyli collects lymph from the lumbar trunks draining the upper limbs and from the intestinal trunk draining the digestive organs.

F

29

Lymph capillary permeability is due to minivalves and protein filaments.

T

30

Like blood, lymph flows both to and from the heart.

F

31

Lymphoid tissue is mainly reticular connective tissue.

T

32

Lymphocytes reside temporarily in lymphoid tissue, then move to other parts of the body.

T

33

The simplest lymphoid organs are the lymph nodes.

F

34

There are more efferent lymphatic vessels leaving a lymph node than there are afferent vessels entering a lymph node.

F

35

Peyer's patches are clusters of lymphoid tissue found primarily in the large intestine.

F

36

If even a small part of the spleen is left in a ten-year-old child, it will most likely regenerate itself.

T

37

The most important role of the spleen is to provide a site for lymphocyte proliferation and immune surveillance and response.

F

38

In the spleen, red pulp is involved in the immune functions and white pulp is involved in disposing of worn-out RBCs.

F

39

All the lymphoid organs are well developed before birth.

F