CP Final Review

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1

When a rocket ship accelerating in outer space runs out of fuel, it

A) accelerates for a short time, then slows down to a constant velocity.
B) accelerates for a short time, slows down, and eventually stops.
C) no longer accelerates.

C) no longer accelerates.

Chapter 2 Inertia

2

As an object freely falls downward, its

A) Velocity increases
B) Acceleration increases
C) Both of these
D) None of these

A) Velocity increases

Chapter 3 Linear Motion

3

The last instant just before an airplane crashes a passenger jumps out the door and falls only two feet to the ground. The passenger

A) lucky to have studied physics
B) unharmed
C) probably hurt or killed
D) intelligent to think so fast

C) probably hurt or killed

Chapter 3 Linear Motion

4

Distance is to displacement as

A) speed is to velocity
B) impulse is to momentum
C) force is to weight
D) velocity is to acceleration
E) none of the above choices are correct

A) speed is to velocity

Chapter 3 Linear Motion

5

A heavy object and a light object are dropped at the same time from rest in a vacum. The heavier object reaches the ground

A) later than the lighter object
B) sooner than the lighter object
C) at the same time as the lighter object
D) almost immediately

C) at the same time as the lighter object

Chapter 4 Newton's 3rd Law

6

A ball tossed vertically upward rises, reaches its highest point, and then falls back to its starting point. During this time the acceleration of the ball is always
A) in the direction of motion.
B) opposite its velocity.
C) directed upward.
D) directed downward.

D) directed downward

Chapter 3 Linear Motion

7

Your weight is

A) equal to your mass.
B) the gravitational attraction force between you and the Earth.
C) a property of mechanical equilibrium.
D) all of these

B) the gravitational attraction force between you and the Earth.

Chapter 4 Newton's 2nd Law

8

Strange as it may seem, it is just as hard to accelerate a car on a level surface on the moon as it is here on the Earth. This is because

A) the mass of the car is independent of gravity.
B) the weight of the car is independent of gravity.
C) Nonsense! A car is much more easily accelerated on the moon than on the Earth.

A) the mass of the car is independent of gravity.

Chapter 4 Newton's 2nd Law

9

A force is a vector quantity because it has both

A) magnitude and direction.
B) mass and acceleration.
C) action and reaction counterparts.

A) magnitude and direction.

Chapter 4 Newton's 2nd Law

10

A 10-N falling object encounters 4 N of air resistance. The net force on the object is

A) 0 N.
B) 4 N.
C) 6 N.
D) 10 N.
E) none of these

C) 6 N.

Chapter 4 Newton's 2nd Law

11

An archer shoots an arrow. Consider the action force to be the bowstring against the arrow. The reaction to this force is the

A) combined weight of the arrow and bowstring.
B) air resistance against the bow.
C) friction of the ground against the archer's feet.
D) grip of the archer's hand on the bow.
E) arrow's push against the bowstring.

E) arrow's push against the bowstring.

Chapter 5 Newton's 3rd
Law Action and Reaction

12

A player hits a ball with a bat. The action force is the impact of the bat against the ball. The reaction to this force is the

A) air resistance on the ball.
B) weight of the ball.
C) force that the ball exerts on the bat.
D) grip of the player's hand against the ball.
E) weight of the bat.

C) force that the ball exerts on the bat.

Chapter 5 Newton's 3rd Law
Law Action and Reaction

13

A rifle recoils while firing a bullet. The speed of the rifle's recoil is small because the

A) force against the rifle is smaller than against the bullet.
B) momentum is mainly concentrated in the bullet.
C) rifle has much more mass than the bullet.
D) momentum of the rifle is smaller.

C) rifle has much more mass than the bullet.

Chapter 6 Momentum

14

Suppose that a tiny gun made of a strong but very light material fires a bullet that is more massive than the gun itself. For such a weapon

A) the target would be safer than the shooter.
B) recoil problems would be lessened.
C) conservation of energy would not hold.
D) conservation of momentum would not hold.
E) both conservation of energy and momentum would not hold.

A) the target would be safer than the shooter.

Chapter 6 Momentum

15

When you are in the way of a fast-moving object and can't get out of its way, you will suffer a smaller force of impact if you decrease its momentum over a

A) long time.
B) short time.
C) same way either way

A) long time.

Chapter 6 Momentum

16

If you push an object twice as far while applying the same force, you do

A) twice as much work.
B) four times as much work.
C) the same amount of work.
D) half as much work.

A) twice as much work.

Chapter 7 Energy

17

A job is done slowly, while an identical job is done quickly. Both jobs require the same amount of work, but different amounts of

A) energy.
B) power.
C) effort.
D) none of these

B) power.

Chapter 7 Energy

18

A moving object has

A) speed.
B) velocity.
C) momentum.
D) energy.
E) all of these

E) all of these

Chapter 7 Energy

19

Horses that move with the fastest linear speed on a merry-go-round are located

A) near the center.
B) near the outside.
C) anywhere, because they all move at the same speed.

B) near the outside.

Chapter 8 Rotational Motion

20

A torque acting on an object tends to produce

A) equilibrium.
B) rotation.
C) linear motion.
D) velocity.
E) a center of gravity.

B) rotation.

Chapter 8 Rotational Motion

21

Toss a baseball bat into the air and it wobbles about its

A) geometrical center.
B) center of mass.
C) heavier end.

B) center of mass.

Chapter 8 Rotational Motion

22

Which of the following are electrically neutral?
A) proton
B) neutron
C) electron
D) ion
E) none of these

B) neutron

Chapter 11 Atomic Nature of Matter

23

A molecule has
A) mass.
B) structure.
C) energy.
D) all of these
E) none of these.

D) all of these

Chapter 11 Atomic Nature of Matter

24

A force that determines the chemical properties of an atom is a(n)
A) friction force.
B) nuclear force.
C) gravitational force.
D) electrical force.
E) none of these.

D) electrical force.

Chapter 11 Atomic Nature of Matter

25

When a chocolate bar is cut in half, its density is

A) halved.
B) unchanged.
C) doubled.

B) unchanged.

Chapter 12 Solids

26

Stone slabs are stronger under

A) tension.
B) compression.
C) both tension and compression.

B) compression.

Chapter 12 Solids

27

Which potatoes when peeled produce the most peelings?

A) 10 kg of large potatoes
B) 10 kg of small potatoes
C) They both produce the same amount.

B) 10 kg of small potatoes

Chapter 12 Solids

28

Water pressure is greatest against the

A) top of a submerged object.
B) bottom of a submerged object.
C) sides of a submerged object.
D) is the same against all surfaces
E) none of these

B) bottom of a submerged object.

Chapter 13 Liquids

29

Pumice is a volcanic rock that floats. Its density is

A) less than the density of water.
B) equal to the density of water.
C) more than the density of water.

A) less than the density of water.

Chapter 13 Liquids

30

A completely submerged object always displaces its own

A) volume of fluid.
B) weight of fluid.
C) density of fluid.
D) all of these
E) none of these

A) volume of fluid.

Chapter 13 Liquids

31

A plasma differs from a gas in that

A) its molecules are farther apart.
B) it is hotter than a gas.
C) it is electrically conducting.
D) its atoms are boosted to higher atomic numbers.
E) all of these

C) it is electrically conducting.

Chapter 14 Gases and Plasmas

32

Atmospheric molecules do not fly off into outer space because of

A) their relatively high speeds.
B) their relatively low densities.
C) Earth gravitation.
D) cohesive forces.

C) Earth gravitation.

Chapter 14 Gases and Plasmas

33

Atmospheric pressure is caused by the

A) density of the atmosphere.
B) weight of the atmosphere.
C) temperature of the atmosphere.
D) effect of the sun's energy on the atmosphere.

B) weight of the atmosphere.

Chapter 14 Gases and Plasmas

34

When you touch a cold piece of ice with your finger, energy flows

A) from your finger to the ice.
B) from the ice to your finger.
C) actually, both ways.

A) from your finger to the ice.

Chapter 15 Temperature

35

The moderate temperatures of islands throughout the world has much to do with water's

A) poor conductivity.
B) vast supply of internal energy.
C) high specific heat.
D) high evaporation rate.
E) absorption of solar energy.

C) high specific heat.

Chapter 15 Temperature

36

Before ice can form on a lake, all the water in the lake must be cooled to

A) zero degrees C.
B) 4 degrees C.
C) minus 32 degrees C.
D) None of the above. Ice can form at the surface regardless of the water temperature below.

B) 4 degrees C.

Chapter 15 Temperature

37

Substances absorb heat energy by the process of

A) conduction.
B) convection.
C) radiation.
D) all of these

D) all of these

Chapter 16 Heat Transfer

38

Your feet feel warmer on a rug than on a tile floor because a rug

A) is usually warmer than tile.
B) is a better insulator than tile.
C) for the same mass has more internal energy than tile.
D) all of these
E) none of these

B) is a better insulator than tile.

Chapter 16 Heat Transfer

39

An object will normally be a net radiator of energy when its temperature is

A) higher than its surroundings.
B) lower than its surroundings.
C) neither of these

A) higher than its surroundings.

Chapter 16 Heat Transfer

40

Evaporation is a cooling process because

A) heat is radiated during the process.
B) of conduction and convection.
C) the more energetic molecules are able to escape the liquid.
D) the temperature of the remaining liquid decreases.
E) none of these

C) the more energetic molecules are able to escape the liquid.

Chapter 17 Change of Phase

41

A hot dog pants

A) to help evaporation occur in its mouth and bronchial tract.
B) to bring more oxygen into its lungs.
C) for no particular reason – some things just happen.
D) to impress dogs of the opposite sex.

A) to help evaporation occur in its mouth and bronchial tract.

Chapter 17 Change of Phase

42

When a gas is changed to a liquid state, the gas

A) releases energy.
B) absorbs energy.
C) neither releases nor absorbs energy.
D) both releases and absorbs energy.

A) releases energy.

Chapter 17 Change of Phase

43

To totally convert a given amount of mechanical energy into heat is

A) possible.
B) impossible.
C) impossible to answer without additional information

A) possible.

Chapter 18 Thermodynamics

44

A temperature inversion occurs when the upper layers of air are

A) warmer than the lower regions of air.
B) cooler than the lower regions of air.
C) at the same temperature as lower regions of air.

A) warmer than the lower regions of air.

Chapter 18 Thermodynamics

45

A quantity of water has more entropy when it is

A) frozen ice.
B) boiling.
C) at room temperature.

B) boiling.

Chapter 18 Thermodynamics

46

A common source of wave motion is a

A) wave pattern.
B) harmonic object.
C) vibrating object.
D) region of variable high and low pressure.
E) none of these

C) vibrating object.

Chapter 19 Vibrations and Waves

47

A common source of wave motion is a

A) wave pattern.
B) harmonic object.
C) vibrating object.
D) region of variable high and low pressure.
E) none of these

C) vibrating object.

Chapter 19 Vibrations and Waves

48

In a longitudinal wave the compressions and rarefactions travel in

A) the same direction.
B) opposite directions.
C) a vacuum.

A) the same direction.

Chapter 19 Vibrations and Waves

49

Which of the following is not a transverse wave?

A) sound
B) light
C) radio
D) all of these
E) none of these

A) sound

Chapter 19 Vibrations and Waves

50

Double the frequency of a sound and you halve its

A) wavelength.
B) speed.
C) amplitude.
D) all of these
E) none of these

A) wavelength.

Chapter 20 Sound

51

We are best at hearing

A) infrasonic sound.
B) ultrasonic sound.
C) both infrasonic and ultrasonic sounds.
D) None of the above choices are true.

D) None of the above choices are true.

Chapter 20 Sound

52

Sound waves cannot travel in

A) air.
B) water.
C) steel.
D) a vacuum.
E) any of the above media

D) a vacuum.

Chapter 20 Sound

53

Which force binds atoms together to form molecules?

A) gravitational
B) nuclear
C) electrical
D) centripetal
E) none of these

C) electrical

Chapter 22 Electrostatics

54

A positive ion has more

A) electrons than neutrons.
B) electrons than protons.
C) protons than electrons.
D) protons than neutrons.
E) neutrons than protons.

C) protons than electrons.

Chapter 22 Electrostatics

55

To say that electric charge is quantized is to say that the charge on an object

A) may occur in an infinite variety of quantities.
B) is a whole-number multiple of the charge of one electron.
C) will interact with neighboring electric charges.
D) can be neither created nor destroyed.
E) is sometimes positive.

B) is a whole-number multiple of the charge of one electron.

Chapter 22 Electrostatics

56

Stretch a copper wire so that it is thinner and the resistance between its ends

A) decreases.
B) remains unchanged.
C) increases.

C) increases.

Chapter 23 Electric Current

57

In an ac circuit, the electric field

A) increases via the inverse-square law.
B) changes magnitude and direction with time.
C) is the same everywhere.
D) is non-existent.
E) none of these

B) changes magnitude and direction with time.

Chapter 23 Electric Current

58

The primary source of electrons in an ordinary electrical circuit is

A) a dry cell, wet cell or battery.
B) the back emf of motors.
C) the power station generator.
D) the electrical circuit itself.

D) the electrical circuit itself.

Chapter 23 Electric Current

59

Alternating current is normally produced by a

A) battery.
B) generator.
C) both of these
D) neither of these

B) generator.

Chapter 23 Electric Current

60

The source of all magnetism is

A) tiny pieces of iron.
B) tiny domains of aligned atoms.
C) ferromagnetic materials.
D) moving electric charge.
E) none of these

D) moving electric charge.

Chapter 24 Magnetism

61

An iron rod becomes magnetic when

A) positive ions accumulate at one end and negative ions at the other end.
B) its atoms are aligned having plus charges on one side and negative charges on the other.
C) the net spins of its electrons are in the same direction.
D) its electrons stop moving and point in the same direction.
E) none of these

C) the net spins of its electrons are in the same direction.

Chapter 24 Magnetism

62

The field surrounding every moving electron is

A) always magnetic but never electric.
B) always electric but never magnetic.
C) sometimes magnetic and sometimes electric.
D) always both electric and magnetic.
E) none of the above

D) always both electric and magnetic.

Chapter 24 Magnetism

63

Magnetic field lines about a current-carrying wire

A) extend radially from the wire.
B) circle the wire in closed loops.
C) Choices A and B are both correct.
D) None of the above choices are correct.

B) circle the wire in closed loops.

Chapter 24 Magnetism

64

When there is a change in the magnetic field in a closed loop of wire

A) a voltage is induced in the wire.
B) a current is created in the loop of wire.
C) electromagnetic induction occurs.
D) all of these
E) none of these

D) all of these

Chapter 25 Electromagnetic Induction

65

The magnetic field strength inside a current-carrying coil will be greater if the coil encloses a

A) vacuum.
B) wooden rod.
C) glass rod.
D) rod of iron.
E) none of these

D) rod of iron.

Chapter 25 Electromagnetic Induction

66

An electric motor is very similar to

A) an electric generator.
B) an automobile battery.
C) a radio receiver.
D) None of the above choices are correct

A) an electric generator.

Chapter 25 Electromagnetic Induction

67

A transformer actually transforms

A) voltage.
B) magnetic field lines.
C) generators into motors.
D) non-safe forms of energy to safe forms of energy.
E) All of the above choices are correct.

A) voltage.

Chapter 25 Electromagnetic Induction

68

Electromagnetic waves consist of

A) compressions and rarefactions of electromagnetic pulses.
B) oscillating electric and magnetic fields.
C) particles of light energy.
D) high-frequency gravitational waves.

B) oscillating electric and magnetic fields.

Chapter 26 Properties of Light

69

The source of all electromagnetic waves is

A) changes in atomic energy levels.
B) vibrating atoms.
C) accelerating electric charges.
D) crystalline fluctuations.
E) none of these

C) accelerating electric charges.

Chapter 26 Properties of Light

70

Compared to its average speed in air, the average speed of a beam of light in glass is

A) more.
B) less.
C) the same.

B) less.

Chapter 26 Properties of Light

71

Object and image for a plane mirror lie

A) along the same plane.
B) equal distances from the mirror.
C) at right angles to each other.
D) all of these
E) none of these

B) equal distances from the mirror.

Chapter 28 Reflection and Refraction

72

A mirage is a result of atmospheric

A) reflection.
B) refraction.
C) scattering.
D) dispersion.
E) aberrations.

B) refraction.

Chapter 28 Reflection and Refraction

73

When a light beam emerges from water into air, the average light speed

A) increases.
B) decreases.
C) remains the same.

A) increases.

Chapter 29 Light Waves

74

Consider plane waves incident upon a barrier with a small opening. After passing through the opening, the waves

A) continue as plane waves.
B) fan out.
C) converge.
D) become polarized.
E) all of these

B) fan out.

Chapter 29 Light Waves

75

Diffraction is more pronounced through relatively

A) small openings.
B) large openings.
C) same for each

A) small openings.

Chapter 29 Light Waves

76

To perceive greater detail a dolphin emits sounds of

A) lower frequency.
B) higher frequency.
C) greater intensity.
D) greater speed.
E) none of these

B) higher frequency.

Chapter 29 Light Waves

77

Interference is a property of

A) light waves.
B) sound waves.
C) water waves.
D) all of these
E) none of these

D) all of these

Chapter 29 Light Waves

78

Polarization is a property of

A) transverse waves.
B) longitudinal waves.
C) both
D) neither

A) transverse waves.

Chapter 29 Light Waves

79

Light will not pass through a pair of Polaroids when their axes are

A) parallel.
B) perpendicular.
C) 45 degrees to each other.
D) two of these
E) all of these

B) perpendicular.

Chapter 30 Light Emission

80

An excited atom is an atom

A) that has excess vibration.
B) that has one or more displaced electrons.
C) with more protons than electrons.
D) that is frantic.

B) that has one or more displaced electrons.

Chapter 30 Light Emission

81

Light is emitted when an electron

A) is boosted to a higher energy level.
B) makes a transition to a lower energy level.
C) neither of these

B) makes a transition to a lower energy level.

Chapter 30 Light Emission

82

An atom that absorbs a photon of a certain energy can then emit

A) only a photon of that energy.
B) a photon of any energy.
C) only a photon of the same or higher energy.
D) only a photon of the same or lower energy.

D) only a photon of the same or lower energy.

Chapter 30 Light Emission

83

Ultraviolet light is

A) more energetic than X-rays.
B) produced by crossed Polaroids.
C) electromagnetic energy.
D) present everywhere.
E) none of these

C) electromagnetic energy.

Chapter 30 Light Emission

84

Which has more energy per photon?

A) red
B) blue
C) both the same

B) blue

Chapter 30 Light Emission

85

As a solid is gradually heated, the first color to glow is

A) red.
B) yellow.
C) white.
D) blue.

A) red.

Chapter 30 Light Emission

86

Light behaves primarily as a wave when it

A) travels from one place to another.
B) interacts with matter.

A) travels from one place to another.

Chapter 31 Light Quanta

87

Which experiment best demonstrates the particle-like nature of light?

A) photoelectric effect
B) double-slit experiment
C) neither

A) photoelectric effect

Chapter 31 Light Quanta

88

Quantization of electron energy states in an atom is better understood in terms of the electron's

A) wave nature.
B) particle nature.
C) neither of these

A) wave nature.

Chapter 32 Atom and the Quantum

89

A beam of electrons has

A) wave properties.
B) particle properties.
C) both of these
D) neither of these

C) both of these

Chapter 32 Atom and the Quantum

90

Heavy atoms are not appreciably larger in size than light atoms because the nuclei of heavy atoms have more

A) mass.
B) electric charge.
C) nucleons.
D) none of these

B) electric charge.

Chapter 32 Atom and the Quantum

91

What do electrons have that protons always have in equal magnitude?

A) mass
B) charge
C) energy
D) all of these

B) charge

Chapter 32 Atom and the Quantum

92

Which radiation has no electric charge associated with it?

A) alpha rays
B) beta rays
C) gamma rays
D) all of these

C) gamma rays

Chapter 33 Atomic Nucleus and Radioactivity

93

An atom with an imbalance of electrons to protons is

A) a baryon.
B) an ion.
C) an isotope.
D) none of these

B) an ion.

Chapter 33 Atomic Nucleus and Radioactivity

94

Electric forces within an atomic nucleus tend to

A) hold it together.
B) push it apart.
C) neither of these

B) push it apart.

Chapter 33 Atomic Nucleus and Radioactivity

95

The high temperature of the Earth's interior is due mostly to

A) great internal pressure.
B) friction, as plates move past one another.
C) the Earth's natural heat.
D) radioactivity.

D) radioactivity.

Chapter 33 Atomic Nucleus and Radioactivity

96

Which of the following isotopes is radioactive?

A) Carbon-12
B) Carbon-14
C) Both are radioactive.
D) Neither is radioactive in nature.

B) Carbon-14

Chapter 33 Atomic Nucleus and Radioactivity

97

In both fission and fusion, mass

A) is created from energy of other forms.
B) is converted to kinetic energy.
C) remains the same.

B) is converted to kinetic energy.

Chapter 34 Nuclear Fission and Fusion

98

A nucleon has the least mass in the nucleus of

A) hydrogen.
B) iron.
C) lead.
D) uranium

B) iron.

Chapter 34 Nuclear Fission and Fusion

99

Energy released by the sun results from the process wherein atomic nuclei

A) break apart.
B) combine.
C) both of these
D) none of these

B) combine.

Chapter 34 Nuclear Fission and Fusion

100

The most abundant element in the universe is

A) hydrogen.
B) helium.
C) lead.
D) uranium.
E) americanium.

A) hydrogen.

Chapter 34 Nuclear Fission and Fusion