RAD 113 Test 1 Study Guide

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created 2 years ago by hmpalmer93
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Patient Interactions & History Taking
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1

Levels of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs in order from lowest to highest.

  • Physiologic (Food, shelter, clothing)
  • Safety
  • Belongingness and love
  • Esteem
  • Need to Know and Understand
  • Self-Actualization
2

Used in establishing an open relationship between the health professional and the patient.

Verbal communication

3

Verbal communication.

  • Spoken words
  • Written words
  • Voice intonation
  • Slang/Jargon
  • Organized sentences
  • Humor
4

Three types of touch.

  • Emotional support
  • Emphasis
  • Palpation
5

Nonverbal communication.

  • Paralanguage (rhythm of speech)
  • Body language
  • Touch
  • Professional appearance
  • Physical presence
  • Visual contact
6

May help ensure that questions, instructions, and other information have been understood.

Visual contact

7

At what level does the average American read?

8th - 9th grade

8

Age groups.

  • Infant (birth - 1)
  • Toddlers (1-3)
  • Preschoolers (3-5)
  • School-aged (5-10)
  • Adolescents (10-25)
  • Young adults (25-45)
  • Middle aged (45-65)
  • Mature adults (65-older)
9

Physical changes of functional aging.

  • Slowing psychomotor responses
  • Slowing of information processing
  • Decreased visual acuity
  • Decrease in senses
10

Five stages of the grief process.

  • Denial
  • Anger
  • Bargaining
  • Depression
  • Acceptance
11

Type data that is perceptible to the senses, is able to be measured, and is often physiologic.

Signs can be seen, heard, or felt

Objective

12

Type data that is subject to interpretation.

Examples are patient feelings, pain level, attitude, and opinion of observer.

Subjective

13

Sacred 7 of medical histories

  • Localization

(area of patient's complaint)

  • Chronology

(duration)

  • Quality

(Character of symptoms)

  • Severity

(intensity, quantity, or extent of problem)

  • Onset

(what patient was doing when problem started)

  • Aggrivating/Alleviating factors

(what makes it worse/better)

  • Associated manifestations