RAD 111 Test 5 Study Guide

Helpfulness: 0
Set Details Share
created 3 years ago by hmpalmer93
199 views
Human Diversity & Professional Ethics
show moreless
Page to share:
Embed this setcancel
COPY
code changes based on your size selection
Size:
X
Show:
1

Deals with variety of human societies and cultures and examines their similarities and differences.

Simply means the differences inherent among people.

Human diversity (Cultural diversity)

2

Establish behaviors of people. Can be for a lifetime and provide comfort.

Cultures

3

Means that people now cross borders into other countries to work, go to school, receive medical care, visit, and live. Because of this, nations, societies, and businesses have become increasingly cross-cultural or multicultural.

Globalization

4

Defined as possessing a set of attitudes, behaviors, and policies that come together in a system, or among individuals, that enable effective interactions in a cross-cultural framework.

Cultural competency

5

List the key diversity traits.

  1. Age
  2. Ethnicity/national origin
  3. Race
  4. Gender
  5. Sexual orientation
  6. Mental ability
  7. Physical ability
6

Play major role in how individuals perceive others.

Personal biases

7

Process by which people of diverse backgrounds slowly give up their original cultural language and identity and try to merge into another culture (usually the majority).

Diminishes the accomplishments, contributions, and values of one culture in favor of those of the mainstream.

Assimilation

8

List the the aging generations (subsets of population).

  1. World War II
  2. Baby Boomers (1946-1964)
  3. Generation X (1965-1980)
  4. Generation Y (1981-1999)
  5. Generation Z (2000-present)
9

The most significant subset, because of the impact they will have on the population. This subset is considered to be generally healthy and well educated.

Baby Boomers

10

Relates to a person's distinctive racial, national, religious, linguistic, or cultural heritage.

Ethnicity

11

The ability of an individual to be able to negotiate competently two or more cultures (the mainstream's culture & their own culture).

Biculturalism

12

Members of U.S mainstream are said to value the following:

  1. Activity/hard work
  2. Personal achievement/success
  3. Individualism
  4. Efficiency/practicality
  5. Affluence, consumerism, and material comfort
  6. Competition
  7. Openness, directness, and being well informed
13

Embracing diversity

  1. Knowledge of cultural differences is key
  2. Respect others/self
  3. Know your personal biases
  4. Understand individual's values
  5. Seek to learn from those you meet/interact with
  6. Appreciate social value of multiculturalism
  7. Empathy for others
14

Five elements that contribute to becoming culturally competent.

  1. Value diversity
  2. Develop capacity for cultural self-assessment
  3. Become aware of dynamics of cross-cultural interaction
  4. Institutionalize cultural knowledge
  5. Develop adaptations of service delivery that reflects an understanding of a multicultural environment
15

To provide high-quality and effective care for all patients, health care providers need to understand the following six areas of human cultural diversity and how these areas influence the delivery of care.

  1. Communication
  2. Space
  3. Time
  4. Environmental control
  5. Biologic variations
  6. Social organizations
16

Four essential core values of human rights law that are particularly important when thinking about people with disabilities.

  1. Autonomy
  2. Dignity
  3. Equality
  4. Solidarity
17

Person's self-reliance, independence, liberty, rights, privacy, individual choice, freedom of will, and self-contained ability to decide.

Autonomy

18

Doing of good; active promotion of goodness, kindness, and charity.

Beneficence

19

Articulated statement of role morality as seen by the members of a profession.

Code of Ethics

20

Belief that the worth of actions is determined by their ends or consequences; actions are right or wrong according to the balance of their good and bad consequences.

Consequentialism

21

Situations requiring moral judgement between two or more equally problem-fraught alternatives; two or more competing moral norms are present, creating a challenge about what to do.

Ethical Dilemmas

22

Gross violation of commonly held standards of decency or human rights.

Ethical Outrage

23

Bodies of systematically related moral principles used to resolve ethical dilemmas.

Ethical Theories

24

Ethical reflections that emphasize an intimate personal relationship value system that includes such virtues as sympathy, compassion, fidelity, discernment, and love.

Ethics of Care

25

Strict observance of promises or duties; loyalty and faithfulness to others.

Fidelity

26

Equitable, fair, or just conduct in dealing with others.

Justice

27

Regulations established by government and applicable to people within a certain political subdivision.

Can be limiting and are not comprehensive in controlling all possible behaviors.

Can be politically motivated and applied unequally.

Laws

28

Rights of individuals or groups that are established and guaranteed by law.

Legal Rights

29

Basis for rights-based ethical theory; each individual is protected and allowed to pursue personal projects.

Liberal Individualism

30

General, universal guides to action that are derived from so-called basic moral truths that should be respected unless a morally compelling reason exists not to do so; also referred to as ethical principles.

Moral Principles

31

Rights of individuals, or groups that exist separately from governmental or institutional guarantees; usually asserted based on moral principles or rules.

Moral Rights

32

Generally accepted customs, principles, or habits of right living and conduct in a society and the individual's practice in relation to these.

Morals

33

Belief that actions themselves, rather than consequences, determine the worth of actions; actions are right or wrong according to the morality of the acts themselves.

Nonconsequentialism

34

Ethical principle that places high value on avoiding harm to others.

Nonmaleficence

35

Composed of efforts and behaviors that society holds as valuable and worthy. One of several generally accepted criteria that serve to distinguish a profession from other occupations or trades.

Specific to an occupation and defined by members of the profession at many levels.

Professional Ethic

36

Often defined as the science of rightness and wrongness of human conduct as known by natural reason.

Combination of societal laws and values.

Ethics

37

System of Ethics (Application, Control, Enabling Source, Sanctions).

  1. Application - Specific group
  2. Control - Within group
  3. Enabling Source - Codes of Ethics
  4. Sanctions - Expulsion
38

System of Law (Application, Control, Enabling Source, Sanctions).

  1. Application - Political subdivision
  2. Control - Outside group
  3. Enabling Source - Legislation
  4. Sanctions - Fines, prison
39

System of Morals (Application, Control, Enabling Source, Sanctions).

  1. Application - Individuals
  2. Control - Conscience
  3. Enabling Source - Religious writing
  4. Sanctions - Shame, guilt
40

Defined by laws and morals.

Societal behavior

41

Defined by two distinct documents, professional Standards of Conduct and Scope of Practice. Establishes norms for professional conduct.

Professional behavior

42

Sources for Ethical Attitudes.

  1. Science
  2. Culture
  3. Religion
  4. Experience
43

The ARRT Code of Ethics is composed of two parts. What are these two parts and what do they deal with?

  1. Part A - deals with behaviors a professional should aspire to achieve
  2. Part B - deals with mandatory rules of acceptable professional conduct
44

List Ethical Theories.

  1. Consequentialism
  2. Nonconsequentialism
  3. Social Contracts
  4. Rights-based ethics
  5. Principle-based ethics
  6. Virtue-based ethics
45

Steps taken during ethical analysis.

  1. Identify the problem
  2. Develop alternative solutions
  3. Select best solution
  4. Defend chosen selection
46

Steps taken when solving ethical dilemmas.

  1. Examination of problem
  2. Clarification
  3. Determination of alternatives
  4. Decision making
47

List the basic ethical principles.

  1. Beneficence
  2. Nonmaleficence
  3. Autonomy
  4. Veracity
  5. Fidelity
  6. Justice
48

List the different Professional relationships.

  1. Toward patients
  2. Toward physicians
  3. Toward co-workers/other health care providers
49

How to avoid Ethical conflicts.

  1. Understand some situations are unavoidable
  2. Clearly understand the right/wrong thing to do
  3. Choose right thing to do
  4. When unsure, research professional standards of conduct and ethical principles as a guide
50

Use of moral principles as a basis for defending a chosen path of action in resolving an ethical dilemma.

Principle-based Ethics

51

Belief system based on a set of moral principles that are embedded in a common morality.

Principlism

52

Manners and attitudes generally accepted by members of a profession.

Professional Etiquette

53

Belief that individual rights provide the vital protection of life, liberty, expression, and property.

Rights-based Ethics

54

ARRT's mandatory standards of minimally acceptable professional conduct. These are enforcable and can result in sanctions should the ARRT determine the certificate holder has violated any of the rules.

Rules of Ethics

55

Relationship that exists when two mutually dependent groups in a society recognize certain expectations of each other and conduct their affairs accordingly.

Social contract

56

Practice behaviors that are defined by members of a profession.

Standards of Professional Conduct

57

Collection or set of values that an individual or group has as each person's personal guide.

Value system

58

Duty to tell the truth and avoid deception.

Veracity

59

Traits of character that are socially valued, such as courage.

Virtues

60

Ethical theory that emphasizes the agents who perform actions and make choices.

Virtue-based Ethics

61

__________ and __________ form the framework of Virtue-based ethics.

  1. Character
  2. Virtue