RAD 111 Test 2 Study Guide

Helpfulness: 0
Set Details Share
created 3 years ago by hmpalmer93
417 views
Intro to Clinical Education & Radiology Administration
show moreless
Page to share:
Embed this setcancel
COPY
code changes based on your size selection
Size:
X
Show:
1

Three areas of learning education as a medical imaging professional will include.

  1. Cognitive
  2. Affective
  3. Psychomotor
2

Establishes the foundation of competency-based education, which incorporates input from our professional bodies supporting quality patient care.

Clinical education/practice

3

The professional organization that provides a curriculum articulating educational guidelines to ensure that entry level radiographers posses the necessary skills and knowledge for practice.

American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT)

4

The accrediting body for the profession that establishes standards for educational programs incorporating the ASRT curriculum.

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology JRCERT

5

The professional certifying agency which identifies the minimum didactic and clinical competency requirements for certification.

American Registry for Radiology Technology

6

According to __________, the program (Clinical Education) is to provide a well-structured competency-based curriculum that prepares students to practice in the professional discipline.

Standards for an Accredited Educational Program in Radiography

7

Developed Standards for an Accredited Educational Program in Radiography.

JRCERT

8

How would you be eligible for participation in the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists radiographic examination?

  1. Clinical competence must be demonstrated and completed, performed independently, consistently, and effectively
9

Component of the radiography curriculum that includes procedures and activities that occur in the clinical educational settings.

Clinical

10

What does clinical experiences include?

One-on-one direct patient contact

11

During clinical experiences, interactions with _________, __________, __________, and __________ occur.

  1. Inpatients
  2. Outpatients
  3. Emergency patients
  4. Specialty patients of all ages
12

Component of the radiography curriculum that deals with informational and instructional activities related to radiography.

Didactic

13

Settings in which didactic activities occur.

  1. Classroom
  2. Lab
  3. Instructional media viewing area
  4. Learning resource center
14

Instructional (didactic) activity should be well planned with __________, __________, and __________ provided for the students.

  1. Documented goals
  2. Objectives
  3. Learning activities
15

Setting that serves as a bridge to connect classroom with clinical activities.

Lab

16

What foundation of knowledge is being introduced to students within the didactic and laboratory areas?

Theoretic

17

Is exemplified in the clinical education component of radiography education with the students recalling prior knowledge learned and using this knowledge in performing radiographic procedures to develop both the skills and the confidence to work with a wide variety of patients.

The principle of transfer of learning

18

Area of learning (domain) that includes behaviors requiring various levels of thought: knowledge, understanding, reason, and judgment.

Cognitive

19

Area of learning (domain) that includes behaviors involving physical actions, neuromuscular manipulations, and coordination.

Psychomotor

20

Area of learning (domain) that includes behaviors guided by feelings and emotions that are influenced by an individual's interests, attitudes, values, and beliefs.

Affective

21

As your education evolves, emphasis in learning will shift from the classroom to the ___________.

Clinical

22

Purpose is to provide an environment in which the student can transfer learning from the didactic and lab settings to real-world patient-care experiences. Permits one-on-one, direct patient contact.

Clinical education

23

Learning is a __________.

Continuum

24

The learning process is based on __________, __________, and __________.

  1. Performance objectives
  2. Learning observed by way of competencies
  3. Learning outcomes
25

One element of the major categories of learning. Is a description of an observable student behavior and must be concise, measurable, and achievable.

Performance objective

26

The observable, successful achievement of the performance objectives.

Competency

27

A more recent educational trend that is directed toward a learner focus. Identify what the student should be able to achieve.

Learning outcomes

28

Must be performed independently, consistently, and effectively.

Clinical competence

29

Used for program development and evaluation. Includes criteria for program accountability and provides for the appropriate supervision of students. It was adopted in 1996 and later revised in 2013 by JRCERT.

Standards

30

Individuals who work together to assist the student in understanding and accomplishing the goals and objectives of the program.

  1. Program director
  2. Didactic faculty
  3. Clinical coordinator
  4. Clinical faculty
  5. Clinical staff
31

Works full time in organizing, administering, and assessing the radiography program. Responsible for the didactic and clinical effectiveness of the program.

Program director

32

Works closely with the program director in ensuring the program effectiveness through a regular schedule of coordination, instruction, and evaluation. Will be among the program's officials if a program has 5 or more education settings or more than 30 students enrolled in the clinical component.

Clinical coordinator

33

Has the opportunity to influence the professional development of the radiography student in a direct manner. Works with the student in one-on-one observation, instruction, and evaluation. They should also possess the appropriate professional credentials.

Clinical instructor

34

Responsible for teaching general education, professional, and technical courses within the radiography curriculum. They are individually qualified to teach the appropriate course work. Work closely with the program director.

Didactic faculty

35

Assist the clinical instructor in one-on-one observation and instruction of radiography students.

Clinical staff

36

Phases of clinical learning.

  1. Observation
  2. Assistance
  3. Performance
37

Phase of the educational experience that is extensive during the early portion of the program. It tapers off as the new student gains confidence and can effectively integrate the appropriate cognitive, psychomotor, and affective behaviors. (The student's eyes are open to anything and everything that goes on)

Observation

38

Phase in which the student begins aiding and supporting the radiographer in the performance of the diagnostic procedure.

Assistance

39

Phase in which the student should accurately demonstrate all tasks included in the entire procedure at the level of skill determined by the faculty.

Performance

40

Should be provided by the clinical instructor and should provide effective nonjudgmental descriptive information of how clinical performance could be improved.

Feedback

41

Defines the purpose of the hospital's existence and provides guidance in its community service.

Hospital Mission Statement

42

What the governance of a hospital begins with.

Board of directors (governing board)

43

Is accountable to the hospital board.

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

44

Who the hospital divisions and departments are accountable to.

CEO

45

The formal organized structure of physicians within a hospital with authorized privileges, bylaws, elected officers, committees, and organized activities.

Medical staff

46

Are interrelated and are sometimes directly dependent on one another. Organized to provide care and clinical support services to its patients and clients.

Departments

47

Responsible for recruitment, retention, benefits, and compensation of all employees who work in the hospital.

Human resources department

48

Subdepartments of radiology.

  1. Diagnostic radiography
  2. Ultrasound (US)
  3. Nuclear medicine (NM)
  4. Positron emission tomography (PET)
  5. Computed tomography (CT)
  6. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  7. Interventional radiology (IR) (special procedures)
49

Varies depending on size and scope, often consists of subdepartments, requires support services, and is led by an Administrative Director.

Radiology organization

50

Typically reports directly to upper hospital administration, requires strong business management skills, and works closely with the Medical Director of Radiology. Not necessarily a radiologic technologist.

Administrative Director of Radiology

51

Principle responsibility is for overseeing the quality of patient care, works closely with the Administrative Director, and may also serve as the Department Chair. Typically a physician.

Medical Director

52

Responsible for staffing, planning, educating, supervising, organizing, coordinating, communicating, maintaining safety, and minimizing hazards in the workplace.

Administrative Director of Radiology

53

Program established in order to elevate the professionalism of radiology administrators. Identifies those who have proven skills and knowledge in medical imaging management.

Certified Radiology Administrator (CRA)

54

Established the Certified Radiology Administrator (CRA) in 2002.

Radiology Administration Certification Commission

55

The primary functions of management.

  1. Planning
  2. Organizing and facilitating
  3. Staffing
  4. Directing
  5. Controlling
  6. Coordinating
56

Important for management functions.

Communication skills

57

Key management traits

  1. Leadership skills
  2. "Coaching" staff
58

Functions of management are evolving from the traditional roles of directing and controlling employees to leading, coaching, and supporting employees. The influence for this change comes from the movement toward __________, __________, or __________.

  1. Continuous quality improvement (CQI)
  2. Total quality management (TQM)
  3. Performance improvement (PI)
59

The primary management function that charts a course of action for the future that enables coordinated and consistent fulfillment of goals and objectives.

Planning

60

The development of a structure or framework that identifies how people do their work.

Organizing

61

Describes what management does in the way of helping, assisting, and expediting processes.

Facilitating

62

Involves getting the right people to do the work and developing their abilities so they can do the work better.

Staffing

63

Involves the stimulation of effort needed to perform the required work.

Directing

64

Defines performance standards or guidelines used to measure progress toward the goals of the organization.

Controlling

65

Process by which the manager achieves orderly group activities and unity of effort by workers who are fully aware of a common purpose.

Coordinating

66

Critical areas in which optimal coordination requires superior skills.

  1. Presentation
  2. Debate
  3. Analysis
  4. Articulation
67

The four steps the controlling process can be described in.

  1. Establishing methods of achieving planned goals and objectives
  2. Defining standards and measures to give feedback on progress
  3. Measuring and reporting progress
  4. Taking action to correct variations from the expected standards
68

Would include standards that govern functions such as equipment operation (quality control), radiation control, and specific routines for radiographic positioning and exposure.

Technical standards

69

An example of an involuntary regulating activity tied to reimbursement.

Accreditation of mammography services for payment by Medicare and other insurance providers

70

Involves organizing and managing resources for a project to be carried out within a specified period with defined costs and expected outcomes.

Project management

71

List of external regulatory agencies.

  1. The Joint Commission (TJC)
  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)
  3. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
  4. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
  5. American College of Radiology (ACR)
  6. State Health Departments
72

Regulates the operation of a radiology department.

  1. External regulatory agencies
  2. Governing body of the hospital
73

Regulates the quality and safety of care provided to patients and the way a health care organization is supervised and operated.

The Joint Commission (TJC)

74

State regulatory agencies that define rules to protect the health and safety of the patients or clients of a health care facility or provider.

State Health Departments

75

A certificate of authority or permission granted by a state review board allowing a hospital or other health care entity to construct new facilities, develop new services, or purchase expensive equipment or technologies.

Certificate of Need (CON)

76

Radiation-regulating agency for control of equipment and technologists.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)

77

Federal agency that establishes standards for safety in the workplace.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

78

Regulate operations in a hospital. Vary from hospital to hospital and are typically committee based.

Internal regulatory agencies

79

List of internal regulatory groups.

  1. Safety Committee
  2. Infection Control Committee
  3. Radiation Safety Committee
  4. Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee
  5. Risk Management and Corporate Compliance
  6. Picture Archive and Communications Systems (PACs)
80

Required for hospitals by TJC. Directs education of employees on safety policies and procedures and ensures safe operation of the facility for patients and employees.

Safety Committee

81

Conducts epidemiologic studies for patient and employee protection.

Infection Control Committee

82

Regulates hospital activities for radiation safety and nuclear medicine activities. Required by the NRC and TJC.

Radiation Safety Committee

83

Required committee of hospital medical staff responsible for reviewing drugs and their use in the hospital.

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee

84

Developed to manage and control the amount of legal and financial risk to the organization and ensure that the hospital continues to remain in good standing with its reputation in the community. Goal is to keep the organization, employees, and patients free from any risks that may hinder quality of care and to guarantee the safety of all customers.

Risk Management and Corporate Compliance

85

Became widely accepted as a digital alternative to film-screen imaging devices. Defined as a system for acquiring, archiving, interpreting, and distributing digital images throughout a health system enterprise.

Picture Archive and Communications Systems

86

Desirable employee characteristics.

  1. Strong technical skills
  2. Excellent teamwork skills
  3. Customer-service oriented
  4. Good communication skills with patients, colleagues, and physicians
  5. Professional attitude
  6. Good work ethic