Chapter 9

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1

Health literacy is:

the ability to understand basic health concepts and apply to one's own health decisions

2

Types of educations in health literacy are:

formal education, nonformal education, and informal education

3

What is health?

the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.

4

Baby boomers are interested in:

Food news

5

Baby boomers confused by:

food news

6

Ever-evolving science of nutrition has:

progressed from three square meals a day & a well-rounded diet to MyPlate.

7

Nutrition Facts panel must list per serving:

energy, fat, total food energy, food energy from fat, total fat, saturated fat, including trans fat.

8

Judging reliability by testing:

the validity and reliability nutrition "news" by asking who, what, when, where and why.

9

Nutrition facts label intended to:

provide consumers with reliable and useful information, help avoid nutritional excesses

10

Health claims relate:

a nutrient or food component to risk of a disease or health-related condition

11

Food labeling is approved by:

FDA

12

Dietary supplements covered by:

food labeling regulations

13

Food labels - structure/function claims offer:

the possibility that a food may improve or support body function

14

Dietary Supplements are:

a group name for products that contain one or more dietary ingredients including vitamins, minerals, herbs or other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances

15

Nutrient supplements may be recommended as a:

safety net and for specific subgroups

16

Regulations and labeling is regulated by:

Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994.

17

Dietary supplement labels must list:

ingredients & content.

18

Ingredients must include:

vitamins, minerals, and macronutrients

19

Content must be compared with:

RDI guidelines

20

FDA estimates there are:

more than 29,000 supplements on the market with more added daily

21

Majority of supplements used are:

multivitamin/multimineral supplements

22

Scientific research is lacking for:

many herbal products

23

With supplements you want to make sure they are:

free of contaiminants or impurities, such as natural toxins, bacteria, pesticides, glass, lead or other substances.

24

Make sure supplements contain:

the stated amount of a dietary ingredient

25

Make sure supplements are:

properly packaged

26

Make sure supplements are made from:

ingredients that were properly handled

27

Manufacturers must report all:

serious dietary supplement adverse events to the FDA

28

There are major differences between:

how supplements and drugs are regulated and market

29

Herbs are technically:

unapproved drugs

30

Dietary supplements are regulated by the FDA as:

foods

31

Dietary supplements:

do not have to meet the same standards as drugs and over-the-counter medications

32

Drug-nutrient interactions have potential to:

reduce drug efficacy or absorption, interfere with disease control, foster nutritional deficiencies, influence food intake, absorption, and metabolism, provoke toxic reaction, dietary supplements may act as drugs

33

An eating plan may not provide:

optimal amounts of all nutrients if the food has been improperly stored or overly processed.

34

The more that is done to food before it is eaten:

the greater the loss of naturally present nutrients

35

Vitamins, minerals, and fiber are:

particularly vulnerable to the effects of food processing.

36

Functional foods generally regarded as foods that provide:

good health by containing physiologically active food components

37

Manufactured functional food is:

a blend of food and pharmacy & food has one or more functional ingredients added

38

Environmental working group created:

a ranking of produce from worst to best

39

USDA maintains that organic foods are:

not safer than conventional foods

40

Food and Drug Administration:

establishes federal standards & regulates most foods, drugs and cosmetics

41

USDA:

monitors safety of meat, poultry, and eggs; educates the public

42

CDC:

promotes general health & offers resources for consumers

43

EPA =

environmental protection agency

44

EPA:

?

45

Most common systems of foodborne illness:

may be mistaken for the flu

46

Who are the high-risk groups for foodborne illness?

Elderly, pregnant women, and infants

47

In the United States as many as 48 million illness and 3000 deaths per year are attributed to:

consumption of contaminated food or water

48

The majority of foodborne illnesses are caused by:

bacteria

49

Other causes of foodborne illnesses include:

viruses, parasites, and molds

50

Foods containing animal proteins are:

the most frequent vehicles

51

Foodborne illness is transmitted to people from:

within the food

52

Symptoms that warrant medical attention of foodborne illness includes:

bloody diarrhea, a stiff neck with severe headache and fever, excessive diarrhea or vomiting and any symptoms that persist for more than 3 days

53

Major cause of foodborne illnesses is:

unsanitary food handling

54

Steps must be taken to prevent:

cross contamination between raw and cooked foods and through food handlers

55

Mad Cow Disease:

is a progressive neurological disease of cattle, which is fatal

56

Mad cow disease is:

caused by infected protein eaten by the cattle

57

Mad cow disease is also called:

bovine spongiform encephalopath

58

Food irradiation is used:

to reduce or eliminate pathogens that can cause foodborne illness

59

Food irradiation is sometimes referred to as:

electronic pasteurization

60

Food irradiation is the most:

extensively studied food-processing technique available in the world

61

Federal law requires irradiated food to be:

labeled

62

Food biotechnology is also known as:

GMOs

63

GMOs:

combines plant science with genetics to improve food