Presidency

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1

when the president may sometimes have to violate the law to preserve the nation

doctrine of executive prerogative

2

the collective name for the president’s formal advisers

Cabinet

3

the title given to the heads of executive departments

Secretary

4

the agency within the Executive Office of the President that reviews budget requests, legislative initiatives, and proposed rules and regulations from the executive agencies

(OMB) Office of Management and Budget

5

the president’s official forum for deliberating about national security and foreign policy, which includes the president as chair, the vice president, the secretary of state, the secretary of the treasury, and the secretary of defense

(NSC) National Security Council

6

the tendency for members of policymaking groups to go along with the prevailing view and mute their own misgivings

Groupthink

7

national security policy involves what?

  • diplomacy
  • intelligence
  • military force
  • economics
  • international law
8

a formal statement issued by the president to the nation, often, but not always, to declare ceremonial occasions

Proclamations

9

official documents, having the force of law, through which the president directs federal officials to take certain actions

Executive Orders

10

a statement issued by a president on signing a bill, which sometimes challenges specific provisions on constitutional or other grounds

Signing statements

11

a temporary appointment that a president can make when the Senate is in recess. Such appointments do not require Senate approval and last until the end of the next Senate session, or up to two years

Recess appointments

12

an agreement reached between the president of the United States and a foreign nation on matters that do not require formal treaties (and therefore Senate approval)

Executive agreements

13

the doctrine stating that the president may sometimes legitimately refuse to provide executive branch information to Congress, the courts, or the public

Executive privilege