Mental Health Theoretical Concepts

Helpfulness: 0
Set Details Share
created 3 years ago by NalaS
19 views
Ego Defense Mechanisms (Moderate Anxiety)
Subjects:
nursing
show moreless
Page to share:
Embed this setcancel
COPY
code changes based on your size selection
Size:
X
Show:
1

Compensation

  • Covering up a real or perceived weakness by emphasizing a trait one considers more desirable

e.g. a physically handicapped boy is unable to play football so he becomes a scholar

2

Denial

  • Refusing to acknowledge the existence of a real situation or the feelings associated with it.

e.g. A woman drinks alcohol every day and can't stop because she doesn't acknowledge she has a problem.

3

Displacement

  • The transfer of feelings from one target to another that is considered less threatening or that is neutral.

e.g. A client is angry with is physician and does not express it but becomes verbally abusive with the nurse.

4

Identification

  • An attempt to avoid expressing actual emotions associated with a stressful situation by using the intellectual processes of logic, reasoning, and analysis.

e.g. A teen who required lengthy rehab after an accident decides to become a physical therapist due to his experience.

5

Intellectualization

  • An attempt to avoid expressing actual emotions associated with a stressful situation by using the intellectual processes of logic, reasoning and analysis.

e.g. S's husband is being transferred with his job to a city far away from her parents, she hides anxiety by explaining to her parents the advantages associated with the move.

6

Introjection

  • Integrating the beliefs and values of another individual into one's own ego structure.

e.g. Children integrate their parents value system into the process conscience formation. A child says to a friend "Don't cheat. It's wrong"

7

Isolation

  • Separating a thought or memory from the feeling, tone, or emotion associated with it.

e.g. A young woman describes being attacked and raped, without showing any emotion.

8

Projection

  • Attributing feelings or impulses unacceptable to one's self to another person.

e.g. Sue feels a strong sexual attraction to her coach and tells her friend "he's coming onto me!"

9

Rationalization

  • Attempting to make excuses or formulate logical reasons to justify unacceptable feelings or behaviors.

e.g. John tells the rehab nurse, "I drink because it's the only way I can deal with my bad marriage and my worse job"

10

Reaction Formation

  • Preventing unacceptable or undesirable thoughts or behaviors from being expressed by exaggerating opposite thoughts of types of behaviors.

e.g. Jane hates nursing, she attended nursing school to please her parents. During career day she speaks to prospective students about the excellence of nursing as a career.

11

Regression

  • Retreating in response to stress to an earlier level of development and the comfort measures associated with that level of functioning.

e.g. When 2 yo Jay is hospitalized he will only drink from a bottle, even though his mom states he has been drinking from a cup for 6 months.

12

Repression

  • Involuntarily blocking unpleasant feelings and experiences from one's awareness.

e.g. An accident victim can remember nothing about his accident

13

Sublimation

  • Rechanneling of drives or impulses that are personally or socially unacceptable into activities that are constructive.

e.g. A mother whose son is killed by a drunk driver channels her anger and energy into heading the local Mothers against drunk driving.

14

Supression

  • The voluntary blocking of unpleasant feelings and experiences from one's awareness.

e.g. Scarlett Ohara's "I don't want to think about that now. I'll think about that tomorrow"

15

Undoing

  • Symbolically negating or canceling out an experience that one finds intolerable.

e.g. Joe is nervous about his new job and yells at his wife, on his way home he stops and buys her some flowers.