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is homosexuality genetic
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1

Identical twins have the same genes; they are born from the same mother in the same environment. If homosexuality is caused by genetics and one twin is gay, the other twin should also be gay.

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if an identical twin has same-sex attraction the chances the co-twin has it is only about 11% for men and 14% for women.

The predominant things that create homosexuality in one twin and not in the other have to be post-birth factors

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About 3% of the heterosexual population used to firmly believe they were gay or bisexual. Homosexuality is caused by post birth factors. These factors could be social, environmental, even a person’s influence on someone else, primarily when that person is in a role model position.

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In another study by Dr. Mitchell Bailey of Northwestern University 400 sets of twins were studied to determine if some men are genetically predisposed to being gay. He found that gay men shared the x chromosome x26q.

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Two American activists recently published studies showing that if one of a pair of identical twins is homosexual, the other member of the pair will be, too, in just under 50% of the cases. On this basis, they claim that "homosexuality is genetic."

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There are only two major principles that need to be carefully understood in order to see through the distortions of the recent research. They are as follows:

  1. Heritable does not mean inherited.
  2. Genetics research which is truly meaningful will identify, and then focus on, only traits that are directly inherited.

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Almost every human characteristic is in significant measure heritable. But few human behavioral traits are directly inherited, in the manner of height, for example, or eye color. Inherited means "directly determined by genes," with little or no way of preventing or modifying the trait through a change in the environment.

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Suppose you are motivated to demonstrate—for political reasons—that there is a basketball gene that makes people grow up to be basketball players. You would use the same methods that have been used with homosexuality: (1) twin studies; (2) brain dissections; (3) gene "linkage" studies.

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What the majority of respected scientists now believe is that homosexuality is attributable to a combination of psychological, social, and biological factors.

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In the case of homosexuality, the inherited traits that are more common among male homosexuals might include a greater than average tendency to anxiety, shyness, sensitivity, intelligence, and aesthetic abilities. But this is speculation. To date, researchers have not yet sought to identify these factors with scientific rigor.

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Of course, there is a political implication to the misuse of the idea that there is a heritable component to homosexuality—that is, the false notion that if it is "genetic," then it must be unchangeable. But I think the most important point that one can make about homosexuality is that it is significantly changeable—although statistically, not for everyone

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As a matter of fact, there is an extremely interesting statistic in the more detailed version of the Sex in America survey (The Social Organization of Sexuality), which showed that 2.8% of the men in their sample were essentially homosexual. But a much larger percentage had been homosexual at some point in their lives previously. Somewhere between 10% and 16% had apparently gone through a homosexual phase.

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By gay activist standards they would be people who would have a supposed—and supposedly fixed—"gay identity," yet by the time they were adults and were sampled in the survey, they had given homosexuality up. In fact, the largest proportion by far had given it up.

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There are also case reports in the psychiatric literature of single individuals as well as groups of individuals who in a variety of settings actually do spontaneously leave a homosexual identity.

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The debate over homosexuality has been profoundly affected by the current culture of complaint. Many, many areas of political life, social life and scientific life today are being profoundly influenced by the various competing claims and cross-claims to victimhood.

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A recent article in a psychiatric publication informed us that 30% of all 20-year-old homosexual men will be HIV-positive or dead by the age of thirty

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The normalization of homosexuality was a classic example where the American Psychiatric Association (APA) knuckled under [when, in 1973, they removed homosexuality from their list of mental illnesses] to a victim group's pressure tactics. In that instance, no substantive data was presented either to "prove" that homosexuality is an illness, or to "prove" that it is not.

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In some ways I think the psychiatric establishment was right—homosexuality is not a disease the way that, say, pneumonia or cancer or schizophrenia are diseases. Homosexuality makes a certain kind of sense as an understandable adaptation to some types of life circumstances

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The debate over homosexual "rights" often spirals into a discussion over whether homosexuality is a learned behavior or a genetic trait. Many homosexual activists insist that they cannot help their sexual behavior. They have argued that scientists have "proven" homosexuality is biological through studies that link sexual orientation to everything from differences in portions of the brain, to genes, finger length and inner ear differences.

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The first frenzy of this trend erupted in 1991 when Simon LeVay published a study in Science. His study noted a difference in a brain structure called the hypothalamus when evaluating homosexual and heterosexual men. LeVay found that in the specimens he studied, the hypothalamus was generally larger in heterosexual men than in homosexual men. Therefore he concluded that these findings "suggest that sexual orientation has a biologic substrate."

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Fifty-two percent of the identical twins shared the same homosexual sexual orientation, while only 22 percent of fraternal twins fell into the same category. This finding appears to support the argument for biology, since identical twins share the same genes. However, the rate of non-twin conformity should mirror that of fraternal twins. In the Bailey and Pillard study, the rate was only 9.2 percent.

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In 1998, researchers Dennis McFadden and Edward G Pasanen published a study that evaluated the auditory systems of heterosexuals and homosexuals. Specifically the study considered differences in echo-like waveforms emitted from an inner ear structure of people with normal hearing. These waves are higher in women than in men, often attributed to the person's exposure to androgen (a male hormone) in his or her early development as a fetus.

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The media eagerly jumped on this bandwagon, touting the evidence that homosexuality is indeed biological. But even the researchers themselves are not too quick to draw definitive conclusions. They caution that the results are only tentative.

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In March 2000, yet another study on a biological link to homosexuality hit the media with fanfare. This time researchers weren't looking at ears, but fingers. Scientists believe finger length indicates how much exposure a person had to androgen while in the womb.

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Typically, people's index finger is slightly shorter than the ring finger—a difference that is seen more clearly on the right hand due to exposure to higher levels of androgen while the human is developing in the womb. In females, the ring finger and index finger are almost the same size, but in men the ring finger is generally shorter.

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In this study, Berkeley's Dr. Breedlove, who had in 1997 shown how sexual activity can change brain structure, found that homosexual women's finger length had a tendency to follow the male pattern. But again, the media was more eager than the researcher to draw definitive conclusions as to what this means

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In fact, Breedlove told CNN, "There is no gene that forces a person to be straight or gay.... I believe there are many social and psychological, as well as biological, factors that make up sexual preference."

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Homosexual activists have been working to legitimize their sexual behavior for decades. Now they have found a strategy to win a foothold in America's heart. "If homosexuality is biological, how can society condemn it?" they argue. Unfortunately, their "proof" is based on flawed studies and media spins. Science has yet to produce a conclusive study that shows homosexuality has a biological cause.

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As homosexual activists vie for legitimacy in American society, citizens and legislators would do well to avoid putting their confidence in political rhetoric and take some time to examine the facts.

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While LeVay's study hit the media with a splash that rippled from coast to coast, it was anything but conclusive. An analysis of the study and its methodology reveals some serious flaws. The first problem, which LeVay himself readily admits, is that all 19 of his homosexual subjects had died of complications associated with AIDS

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