Why parents shouldn't go on their kid's social media

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"A number of parental tracking apps and services exist for monitoring teen activity on smartphones: MamaBear, Life360, Canary and My Mobile Watchdog, to name a few."

~Lori Grishaw

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"If we don't know what is going on in their digital world we can't protect them, we can't guide them,"

~Ameeta Jain, Co founder of TeenSafe

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"It really gives the message, 'I don't trust you at all,' It's over-involvement."

~Barbara Greenberg, a family clinical psychologist and expert on teen behavior.

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Part of maturing, according to Greenberg, means making mistakes and learning from them. If the child feels that the parent is always watching and will always fix everything, the child may develop a lack of confidence and increased anxiety.

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"I understand that parents want to use [tracking services] to make things safer, but they may be defeating their purposes. The way you make your children safe is to make them able to take care of themselves by themselves."

~Michael Brody

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If teens are using them respectfully, appropriately, and with a little parental guidance, they should be fine. Take inventory of your kids' apps and review the best practices.

~Polly Conway

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Ways to prevent them from anything going wrong on the internet: Underaged Facebook, the age limit is 13 but Facebook cant really know your age since you can lie.

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Give them some rules. Like staying on the computer for a certain amount of time.

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Watch what they post. Follow them on social medias like Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and more.

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"Teens are using Instagram to publicly text message, bully and sexualize each other. The benefit is that not only are parents not aware of the behavior, but teens are generally able to remain anonymous as Instagram has no requirement for true identities."

~Curtis Silver

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Teach your children about respect. Respect themselves and others is always an important part of the internet.

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Don't use social media to humiliate them. They won't be happy and they might rebuttal.

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Tell them that whatever they put online is there forever. Texting, posting, and anything else

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"If [parents] have these monitoring apps and they have their passwords to their various accounts, then they can go in and take a look and maybe head off a possible suicide,"

~Jayne Hitchock

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"They may feel that you're invading their privacy, but let’s be honest… You're paying the phone bill, so you can do whatever you want!"

~Anon. from Texas

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"I don't believe children and teens have rights per se, because they aren't yet adults."

~Jason Perlow

I'm human right?

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"Is privacy a fundamental right for adults? Does it extend to children, particularly teenagers and young adults?"

~Unknown

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You have the right to privacy. Even if you are a minor.

~Unknown

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There are websites so you can learn about what your kids are looking though/at.

~Unknown

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If teens are using them respectfully, appropriately, and with a little parental guidance, they should be fine. Take inventory of your kids' apps and review the best practices.

~Polly Conway

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Set an age limit for your child. Including, phone, Instagram, SnapChat, FaceBook, Twitter, and others.

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"I think parents need to say, not just, ‘Don't do this.' But, ‘Let me show you what it can do to somebody."

~Nancy McGarrah

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"McGarrah says the part of the teen brain that controls impulsivity is still developing, so thinking about the consequences isn't their forte. If they're mad, sad, or just have something to say, they let it rip."

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"It causes a lot of problems. What you write causes problems. What you post in terms of pictures causes problems," explained McGarrah.

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"We don't want to snoop as parents. We don't have time for it. But if we're going to be able to keep our kids safe and have a little bit of an insight to what they're going through, then I'm okay with it,"

~Jamie Stuart

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"You can view new contacts that are added so you can monitor your children's friends, you can see what apps they are downloading, how often they are using the apps, which ones they use the most," said Gretchen Whitaker with Verizon Wireless.

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"I think the technology needs to be an adjunctive to parenting. The talking is still the very most important thing," Micki Grimland said.

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Teens want a sense of privacy. They want to know that they can be who they are without their parents trying to correct them.

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Talking to friends helps teens feel that they can talk to someone without getting judged by their parents.

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Parents want to know what their kids are doing without them knowing some of the time.

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Some parents demand that you show them your phone. Whether or not something happened.

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If you use social media then use common sense.

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Always watch who adds/follows/request to follows/retweets just in case. It could be your friend or someone else.

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Never give out any personal information unless its someone you always hang out with.

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Parents should look at the internet at least once with you. So that they know what you look at.

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Never tell a stranger where you live, your full name, where you go to school, not even what country you live in.

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Never send someone a mean message or hate. They dont need you to tell them how to live their life.

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Parents can go on to block settings and block certain websites for your protection.

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Don't hate your parents for trying to protect you. They want what is best for you.

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"I think parents need to say, not just, ‘Don't do this.' But, ‘Let me show you what it can do to somebody."

~Nancy McGarrah

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"McGarrah says the part of the teen brain that controls impulsivity is still developing, so thinking about the consequences isn't their forte. If they're mad, sad, or just have something to say, they let it rip."

...

42

If teens are using them respectfully, appropriately, and with a little parental guidance, they should be fine. Take inventory of your kids' apps and review the best practices.

~Polly Conway

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43

"Is privacy a fundamental right for adults? Does it extend to children, particularly teenagers and young adults?"

~Unknown

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"I don't believe children and teens have rights per se, because they aren't yet adults."

~Jason Perlow

I'm human right?

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"Teens don't feel that they can have a life without their phones."

~Nancy Barlow

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If teens are using them respectfully, appropriately, and with a little parental guidance, they should be fine. Take inventory of your kids' apps and review the best practices.

~Polly Conway

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47

"I understand that parents want to use [tracking services] to make things safer, but they may be defeating their purposes. The way you make your children safe is to make them able to take care of themselves by themselves."

~Michael Brody

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Part of maturing, according to Greenberg, means making mistakes and learning from them. If the child feels that the parent is always watching and will always fix everything, the child may develop a lack of confidence and increased anxiety.

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"Kids just want trust. You were a kid once and probably did much worse things."

~Susane Gomez

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"All in all, they are just trying to protect you. Just set your limits and tell them. They want whats best but give them knowledge about the internet."

~Michael Brody

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