Chapter 46 Flashcards


Set Details Share
created 10 years ago by stizz18
973 views
Subjects:
biology
show moreless
Page to share:
Embed this setcancel
COPY
code changes based on your size selection
Size:
X
Show:

1

Types of Reproduction

• Sexual reproduction is the creation of an 
offspring by fusion of a male gamete (sperm) 
and female gamete (egg) to form a zygote
• Asexual reproduction is creation of offspring 
without the fusion of egg and sperm

2

Mechanisms of Asexual Reproduction

• Many invertebrates reproduce asexually by 
fission, separation of a parent into two or 
more individuals of about the same size

3

Mechanisms of Asexual Reproduction

• In budding, new individuals arise from 
outgrowths of existing ones
• Fragmentation is breaking of the body into 
pieces, some or all of which develop into 
adults
• Fragmentation must be accompanied by 
regeneration, regrowth of lost body parts
• Parthenogenesis is the development of a new 
individual from an unfertilized egg

4

Sexual Reproduction: An Evolutionary Enigma

• Sexual females have half as many daughters as 
asexual females; this is the “twofold cost” of 
sexual reproduction
• Despite this, almost all eukaryotic species 
reproduce sexually
•Sexual reproduction results in genetic recombination, which provides potential advantages

An increase in variation in offspring, providing an increase in the reproductive success of parents in changing environments

An increase in the rate of adaptation

A shuffling of genes and the elimination of harmfulgenes from a population

5

Reproductive Cycles

• Ovulation 
– The release of mature eggs at the midpoint of a 
female cycle
• Most animals exhibit reproductive cycles related 
to changing seasons
• Reproductive cycles are controlled by hormones 
and environmental cues
• Because seasonal temperature is often an 
important cue in reproduction, climate change 
can decrease reproductive success

6

Reproductive Cycles
(Con't)

• Some organisms can reproduce sexually or 
asexually, depending on conditions 
• Several genera of fishes, amphibians, and 
lizards reproduce only by a complex form of 
parthenogenesis that involves the doubling of 
chromosomes after meiosis
• Asexual whiptail lizards are descended from a 
sexual species, and females still exhibit mating 
behaviors

7

Variation in Patterns of Sexual 
Reproduction

• For many animals, finding a partner for sexual 
reproduction may be challenging
• One solution is hermaphroditism, in which 
each individual has male and female 
reproductive systems
• Two hermaphrodites can mate, and some 
hermaphrodites can self‐fertilize
• Individuals of some species undergo sex 
reversals
• Some species exhibit male to female reversal 
(for example, certain oysters), while others 
exhibit female to male reversal (for example, a 
coral reef fish)

8

Fertilization
External

• The mechanisms of fertilization, the union of 
egg and sperm, play an important part in 
sexual reproduction
• In external fertilization, eggs shed by the 
female are fertilized by sperm in the external 
environment

9

Fertilization
Internal

• In internal fertilization, sperm are deposited 
in or near the female reproductive tract, and 
fertilization occurs within the tract
• Internal fertilization requires behavioral 
interactions and compatible copulatory organs
•All fertilization requires critical timing, often 
mediated by environmental cues, 
pheromones, and/or courtship behavior

10

Gamete Production and Delivery

• To reproduce sexually, animals must produce 
gametes
• In most species individuals have gonads, organs 
that produce gametes
• Some simple systems do not have gonads, but 
gametes form from undifferentiated tissue
• More elaborate systems include sets of accessory 
tubes and glands that carry, nourish, and protect 
gametes and developing embryos

11

Human Reproduction
Female Reproductive Anatomy

• The female external reproductive structures 
include the clitoris and two sets of labia
• The internal organs are a pair of gonads and a 
system of ducts and chambers that carry 
gametes and house the embryo and fetus

12

Human Reproduction
Female Reproductive Anatomy
Overies

• Ovaries
• The female gonads, the ovaries, lie in the 
abdominal cavity
• Each ovary contains many follicles, which 
consist of a partially developed egg, called an 
oocyte, surrounded by support cells
• Once a month, an oocyte develops into an 
ovum (egg) by the process of oogenesis

13

Human Reproduction
Female Reproductive Anatomy
Ovaries

Ovulation expels an egg cell from the follicle,  the cells of which produce estradiol prior to  ovulation
• The remaining follicular tissue grows within the  ovary, forming a mass called the corpus luteum
• The corpus luteum secretes estradiol and  progesterone that helps to maintain pregnancy
• If the egg is not fertilized, the corpus luteum
degenerates

14

Human Reproduction
Oogenesis

– Production of eggs, aka ova
– Begins in the developing ovaries of a female 
embryo 
Starts with the formation of diploid cells called 
oogonia
• Can occur as early as the 6th week of embryonic 
development 
•From about the 9th through 20th weeks, the oogonia
enlarge and differentiate, becoming primary oocytes 

15

Female Reproductive Tract
Oogenesis

By the 20th week, all of the primary oocytes have begun meiotic cell 
division, but stop during prophase of meiosis I 
– None of the primary oocytes will resume meiotic cell division until 
puberty, probably 11 to 14 years later 
– A woman is born with her lifetime’s supply of 
primary oocytes—about 1 to 2 million—
– No new ones are generated later in life 
•Many of these die each day, but about 400,000 
still remain at puberty 
• This process is called atresia

16

Female Reproductive Tract
Follicles

– The oocyte plus the layer cells that surrounds it (called 
follicular cells)
– The hormonal changes of the menstrual cycle  stimulate the development of about a dozen 
follicles 

The small follicle cells multiply, providing 
nourishment  for the developing oocyte
– In response to hormones secreted by the anterior  pituitary, they also release estrogen into the  bloodstream 
– Usually, only ONE follicle reaches maturity

17

Female Reproductive Tract
Follicular Development

The Primary Follicle
– Contains a primary oocyte completes meiosis I
– Dividing into a single secondary oocyte and a 
polar body, a small cell that is little more than a
discarded set of chromosomes 
– Meiosis II will not occur unless the egg is 
fertilized 
– Develops into a Secondary Follicle
•Still contains a secondary oocyte, from here one 
in….

18

Female Reproductive Tract
Follicular Development

The Secondary Follicle
– As the follicle matures, it becomes larger and 
fills with fluid 
The Graafian Follicle
• Fully mature 
•Ovulation occurs when the follicle erupts through the surface of the ovary, releasing its secondary 
oocyte
• From this point, the ovulated secondary oocyte can be considered an egg 
• Some of the follicle cells accompany the egg, 
• Most of them remain in the ovary, where they 
enlarge, forming a temporary gland called the 
corpus luteum

19

Female Reproductive Tract
Follicular Development

• Corpus Luteum secretes:
– Estrogen and Progesterone 
• Stimulate the development of the uterine lining
• Play crucial roles in controlling the menstrual 
cycle 
–If fertilization does not occur, the corpus luteum
degenerates a few days later 
– Therefore, it is a temporary endocrine gland

20

Female Reproductive Tract
Journey of the Ova

The ova is ushered into the fallopian tubes
The Fallopian tubes
• Fringed with ciliated “fingers” called fimbria that nearly surround the ovary
• Lined with cilia
•The current from the beating cilia carries the egg down towards the uterus
• May be fertilized at this point 

21

Female Reproductive Tract
Journey of the Ova
The Uterus

– Uterine walls have 2 layers
– Endometrium
• Inner lining
• Richly supplied with blood
• Filled with glands that secrete carbohydrates, 
lipids, and proteins
•Will form the mother’s contribution of the 
placenta

22

Female Reproductive Tract
Journey of the Ova
The Uterus-Myometrium

– Myometrium
• Outer, muscular layer
•Contracts during childbirth, expelling the infant out of the uterus 
•The outer end of the uterus is nearly closed off  by the cervix, a ring of connective tissue that 
encircles a tiny opening 
•The cervix holds the developing baby in the uterus and then expands during labor, permitting passage of the child 

23

Female Reproductive Tract
The Uterus-The Cervix

– The Cervix
• Closes off the outer end of the uterus
• Ring of connective tissue with a small opening
• Holds the developing baby in the uterus 
•Expands during labor, permitting passage of the  child 

24

Female Reproductive Tract
The Vagina

– Opens to the outside 
The lining is acidic, which reduces the likelihood of infections 
– Serves both as the receptacle for the penis and 
sperm during intercourse and as the birth canal 

25

Male Reproductive Tract
Testes

– Located in the scrotum
•This location keeps the testes about 1º to 6º F  (about 0.5º to 3º C) cooler than the core of the  bod
• Cooler temperatures promote sperm development 
– Coiled, hollow seminiferous tubules where sperm 
are produced, nearly fill each testis 

Interstitial cellsthat synthesize testosterone are 
located in the spaces between the tubules 

26

Male Reproductive Tract
Testes: Sperm Production

– Occurs in the seminiferous tubules
– Spermatogonia cells give rise to sperm and Sertoli
cells
– Sertoli cells nourish the developing sperm and  regulate their growth 
– Spermatogonia: 
• Diploid cells 
•Undergo mitotic cell division to form two types of daughter cells 
• One remains a spermatogonium, ensuring a steady 
supply
• The other committed to spermatogenesis, the 
processes that  produce haploid sperm 

27

Male Reproductive Tract
Testes: Spermatogenesis

• Spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and 
spermatids are enfolded in the Sertoli cells 
• As spermatogenesis proceeds, the developing 
sperm migrate to the central cavity of the 
seminiferous tubule into which the mature 
sperm are released 

28

Male Reproductive Tract Vs Female Reproductive Track

• Spermatogenesis differs from oogenesis in three 
ways
– All four products of meiosis develop into sperm 
while only one of the four becomes an egg
– Spermatogenesis occurs throughout adolescence 
and adulthood
– Sperm are produced continuously without the 
prolonged interruptions in oogenesis

29

Male Reproductive Tract
Testes: Spermiogenesis

•A human sperm is unlike any other cell of the body
• Most of the cytoplasm disappears
• The nucleus nearly fills the sperm’s head 
• Acrosome: specialized lysosome
Contains enzymes to dissolve protective layers 
around the egg, enabling the sperm to enter and 
fertilize it 
•Behind the head is the midpiece, which is packed 
with mitochondria 
•Flagellum:  obtains energy from the mitochondria 
and propels the sperm 

30

Male Reproductive Tract
Sperm: The Route out of the Body

– The seminiferous tubules merge to form the 
epididymis, a long, continuous, folded tube 
– The epididymis leads to the vas deferens, a tubule 
that carries sperm out of the scrotum 
The vas deferens joins the urethra, which conducts 
urine out of the body during urination and sperm 
out of the body during ejaculation 
•Most of the roughly hundred million sperm produced by a human male each day are stored in the vas 
deferens and epididymis

31

Male Reproductive Tract
Sperm: The Route out of the Body

– Sperm has fluids added to it en route to make it:
– Semen, is about 5% sperm, mixed with secretions 
from three types of glands that empty into the vas 
deferens or the urethra: 
– The seminal vesicles 
– The prostate gland 
– The bulbourethral glands 

32

Male Reproductive Tract
Sperm: The Route out of the Body

• Seminal Vesicles
-Paired 
Fluid from these glands comprises about 60% of the  semen 
• Fluid is rich in fructose,provides energy for the sperm 
• Its slightly alkaline pH 
Protects the sperm from the acidity of urine remaining in the urethra and from acidic secretions in 
the vagina 
• Also contains prostaglandins
– Stimulate uterine contractions that help to 
transport the  sperm up the female reproductive tract 

33

Male Reproductive Tract
Sperm: The Route out of the Body

• The Prostate
– Produces an alkaline, nutrient‐rich secretion 
– Comprises about 30% of the semen volume 
– Fluid includes enzymes that increase the fluidity 
of the semen once it has entered the vagina
– This permits the sperm to swim more freely

34

Male Reproductive Tract
Sperm: The Route out of the Body

• The Bulbourethral Glands
– Also called Cowper’s Glands
– Secretes the ‘pre‐ejaculate’
– Secretes alkaline mucus into the urethra, 
neutralizing remaining traces of acidic urine 

35

Male Reproductive Tract
Penis

• 3 cylindrical masses of erectile tissue
– Bound by the tunica albuginea
– Corpus cavernosum
• 2, run dorsally along the penis
– Corpus spongiosum
• Surrounds the urethra
•Well supplied with blood, since erection is a hydrodynamic 
event

36

Hormonal Control of Reproduction

• Human reproduction is coordinated by 
hormones from the hypothalamus, anterior 
pituitary, and gonads
• Gonadotropin‐releasing hormone (GnRH) is 
secreted by the hypothalamus and directs the 
release of FSH and LH from the anterior 
pituitary
• FSH and LH regulate processes in the gonads 
and the production of sex hormones

37

Hormonal Control of Reproduction

• Sex hormones serve many functions in 
addition to gamete production, including 
sexual behavior and the development of 
primary and secondary sex characteristics

38

Hormonal Control of the Female 
Reproductive Cycles

• In females, the secretion of hormones and the 
reproductive events they regulate are cyclic
• Prior to ovulation, the endometrium thickens 
with blood vessels in preparation for embryo 
implantation
• If an embryo does not implant in the 
endometrium, the endometrium is shed in a 
process called menstruation

39

Hormonal Control of Reproduction
Hormones closely link the two cycles of female 
reproduction

– Changes in the uterus define the menstrual cycle (also 
called the uterine cycle)
– Changes in the ovaries define the ovarian cycle

40

Hormonal Control of the Menstrual Cycle

• The Ovarian cycle
– In the “typical” 28‐day menstrual cycle
– The beginning of menstruation is designated as 
day 1, because this is easily observed, even 
though the hormonal events that drive the cycle 
actually begin a day or two earlier

1.The releases GnRH, which stimulates the anterior 
pituitary to release FSH and LH 
• At this time the endometrium of the uterus is still 
being shed

41

Hormonal Control of the Menstrual Cycle

• The Ovarian cycle
2. FSH stimulates the development of several 
follicles within each ovary 
• The small follicle cells surrounding the oocyte secrete 
a small amount of estrogen 
•Because of FHS, LH and estrogen, the follicles 
grow
• The primary oocytes enlarge, storing food and other 
substances that will be used by the fertilized egg 
during early development 
• Usually, only one follicle completes development 
each month

42

Hormonal Control of the Menstrual Cycle

• The Ovarian cycle
3.The maturing follicle secretes increasing amounts of estrogen, which has three effects: 
•First, it promotes the continued development of 
the follicle and of the primary oocyte within it 
•Second, it stimulates the growth of the 
endometrium
• Third, estrogen stimulates the hypothalamus to 
release more GnRH

43

Hormonal Control of the Menstrual Cycle

• The Ovarian cycle
4. Increased GnRH stimulates a surge of LH at about 
the 13th or 14th day of the cycle
 
•The increased LH has three important consequences: 
– It triggers the resumption of meiosis I in the 
oocyte, producing the secondary oocyte and the first polar body 

5. Second, the LH surge causes ovulation 
–Third, it transforms the remnants of the follicle 
into the corpus luteum

44

Hormonal Control of the Menstrual Cycle

• The Ovarian cycle
6. The corpus luteum secretes both estrogen and 
progesterone
• Stimulate the growth of the endometrium
7. Estrogen and progesterone inhibit GnRH
production
• Reducing the release of FSH and LH
• Preventing the development of more follicles 

45

Hormonal Control of the Menstrual Cycle

• The Ovarian cycle
8. If the egg is not fertilized, the corpus luteum
starts to disintegrate about 12 days after 
ovulation 
• This occurs because the corpus luteum cannot survive 
without stimulation by LH 
•Because estrogen and progesterone secreted by the 
corpus luteum shut down LH production, the corpus 
luteum actually causes its own destruction 

46

Hormonal Control of the Menstrual Cycle

• The Ovarian cycle
9. With the corpus luteum degenerated
• Estrogen and progesterone levels plummet
• most of the endometerium of the uterus disintegrates 
• Its blood and tissue are shed, forming the 
menstrual  flow 
•The reduced levels of estrogen and progesterone no longer inhibit the hypothalamus, so the 
spontaneous release of GnRH resumes 
• GnRH stimulates the release of FSH and LH, 
•Initiating the development of a new set of 
follicles and  restarting the cycle

47

Hormonal Control of the Menstrual Cycle
• Uterine Cycle

– Controlled by developing follicles 
– They secrete estrogen
– Stimulates the endometrium to become thicker 
and grow an extensive network of blood vessels 
and glands 
– After ovulation, estrogen and progesterone 
released by the corpus luteum further stimulate 
the endometrium
•Thus, if an egg is fertilized, it encounters a 
rich environment for growth 

48

Hormonal Control of the Menstrual Cycle
• Uterine Cycle

– If the egg is not fertilized
– The corpus luteum disintegrates, estrogen and 
progesterone levels fall
– The overgrown endometrium disintegrates as well 
– The uterus then contracts (sometimes causing 
menstrual cramps) and squeezes out the excess 
endometrial tissue, which causes the flow of 
tissue and blood called menstruation

49

Hormonal Control of Pregnancy

•The embryo prevents the negative feedback that 
would otherwise  end the menstrual cycle 
• Once the zygote has implanted in endometrium it secretes  chorionic gonadotropin (CG)
– CG keeps the corpus luteum alive
– Turning it into the corpus luteum of pregnancy
– Which continues to secrete estrogen and 
progesterone for a few months 
The hormones continue to stimulate the development of the endometrium, nourishing the embryo and 
sustaining  the pregnancy 
•Some CG is excreted in the mother’s urine, where  it can be detected to confirm pregnancy 

50

Hormonal Control of the Male 
Reproductive System

Regulation of Sperm Production
• Hormones from the anterior pituitary and 
testes regulate spermatogenesis 
– Spermatogenesis begins at puberty, when GnRH
from the hypothalamus stimulates the anterior 
pituitary to produce LH and FSH 
• LH stimulates the interstitial cells of the 
testes to produce testosterone 
• In combination with FSH, testosterone stimulates 
the Sertoli cells and promotes spermatogenesis 

51

Hormonal Control of the Male 
Reproductive System
Regulation of Sperm Production

• Testicular function is regulated by negative 
feedback 
– Testosterone inhibits the release of GnRH, LH, and FSH
• Which limits further testosterone production and 
sperm development 
– The Sertoli cells, when stimulated by FSH and 
testosterone, secrete a hormone called inhibin, 
which inhibits FSH production by the anterior 
pituitary 
– This complex feedback process maintains relatively 
constant levels of testosterone and sperm 
production 

52

Conception
Male Role

Begins with arousal and subsequent erection of the penis 
• Before erection:
The penis is relaxed (flaccid), the smooth muscles surrounding 
the arterioles that supply it are chronically 
contracted
– Little blood flow
•Under psychological and physical stimulation, the nervous system 
releases nitric oxide onto the muscles of the 
arterioles 
–Nitric oxide activates an enzyme that synthesizes 
cyclic GMP
• An intracellular second messenger that causes 
smooth muscles to  relax 
•Therefore, the arterioles dilate and blood flows into tissue spaces  within the penis 

53

Conception
Male Role

• With the arterioles open
• The tissues become engorged with blood
• This causes the veins to be squeezed shut
• Blood pressure increases, causing an erection 
•During intercourse, movements stimulate the touch 
receptors on the penis, triggering ejaculation 
(usually at orgasm)
• Muscles encircling the epididymis, vas deferens, 
and urethra contract, forcing semen out
– A typical ejaculation consists of about 2 to 5 
milliliters of semen containing about 100 million 
to 400 million sperm 

54

Conception
Female Role

– Sexual arousal causes increased blood flow the 
external genitalia and vagina
– Stimulation may result in orgasm
• All an orgasm is, is a series of rhythmic 
contractions of the vagina and uterus accompanied \by intensely pleasurable sensations 
– Female orgasm is not necessary for fertilization, 
but the contractions of the vagina and uterus 
probably help to move sperm up toward the uterine 
tubes 

55

Conception
 

During fertilization, the sperm and egg nuclei 
unite 
– Neither sperm nor egg lives very long on its own 
• Sperm may live for 2 to 4 days inside the female 
reproductive tract
•An unfertilized egg remains viable for a day or so •The sperm move through the cervix, into the 
uterus,and the uterine tubes 
•If copulation occurs within a day or two of 
ovulation, the sperm may meet an egg in one of the uterine tubes

56

Conception

– The egg is surrounded by follicle cells
•Called the corona radiata, form a barrier between the sperm and the egg 
• A second barrier, the jelly‐like zona pellucida (“clear area”), lies 
between the corona radiata and the egg 
– In the uterine tube, hundreds of sperm reach the 
egg and encircle the corona radiata
– Each sperm releases enzymes from its acrosome
• Weaken corona radiata and the zona pellucida
• Allowing the sperm to wiggle through to the egg 
•If there aren’t enough sperm, not enough enzyme is released, and none of the sperm will reach the egg 
This may be the reason that natural selection had  led to the ejaculation of so many sperm 

57

Conception

– The first sperm contacts the eggs surface:
• The plasma membranes fuse
• The sperm’s head is drawn into the cytoplasm
– This triggers two critical changes:
•Vesicles near the surface of the egg release 
chemicals into the zona pellucida
•This reinforces it and prevents further sperm from entering
• The ova undergoes meiosis II
•This allows for fertilization, i.e. the haploid 
nuclei of sperm and egg fuse, forming a diploid 
nucleus 

58

Conception

• Conception, fertilization of an egg by a sperm, 
occurs in the oviduct
• The resulting zygote begins to divide by 
mitosis in a process called cleavage
• Division of cells gives rise to a blastocyst, a 
ball of cells with a central cavity

59

Conception

• After blastocyst formation, the embryo implants 
into the endometrium
• The embryo releases human chorionic 
gonadotropin (hCG), which prevents 
menstruation
• Pregnancy, or gestation, is the condition of 
carrying one or more embryos in the uterus
•Duration of pregnancy in other species correlates 
with body size and maturity of the young at birth

60

Human Embryonic Development
First Trimester

• Human gestation can be divided into three 
trimesters of about three months each
• The first trimester is the time of most radical 
change for both the mother and the embryo
• During implantation, the endometrium grows 
over the blastocyst

61

Human Embryonic Development
First Trimester

•During its first 2 to 4 weeks, the embryo obtains 
nutrients directly from the endometrium
• Meanwhile, the outer layer of the blastocyst, 
called the trophoblast, mingles with the 
endometrium and eventually forms the placenta
• Blood from the embryo travels to the placenta 
through arteries of the umbilical cord and returns 
via the umbilical vein

62

Human Embryonic Development
First Trimester

•Splitting of the embryo during the first month of 
development results in genetically identical twins
• Release and fertilization of two eggs results in 
fraternal and genetically distinct twins
• The first trimester is the main period of 
organogenesis, development of the body organs
• All the major structures are present by 8 weeks, 
and the embryo is called a fetus

63

Human Embryonic Development
First Trimester

• Changes occur in the mother
– Mucus plug to protect against infection
– Growth of the placenta and uterus
– Cessation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle
– Breast enlargement
– Nausea is also very common

64

Human Embryonic Development
Second Trimester

• During the second trimester
– The fetus grows and is very active
– The mother may feel fetal movements
– The uterus grows enough for the pregnancy to 
become obvious

65

Human Embryonic Development
Third Trimester

• During the third trimester, the fetus grows and 
fills the space within the embryonic 
membranes
• A complex interplay of local regulators and 
hormones induces and regulates labor, the 
process by which childbirth occurs

66

Human Embryonic Development
Third Trimester

• Labor typically has three stages
– Thinning and opening of the cervix, or dilation
– Expulsion or delivery of the baby
– Delivery of the placenta
•Delivery of the baby and placenta are brought 
about by a series of strong, rhythmic uterine 
contractions
•Lactation, the production of milk, is unique to mammals