Medicine: Rapid Interpretation Basics

Helpfulness: 0
Set Details Share
created 9 years ago by jgaversa5
55 views
updated 9 years ago by jgaversa5
show moreless
Page to share:
Embed this setcancel
COPY
code changes based on your size selection
Size:
X
Show:
1

are resting myocardial cells se at negative of positive potentials

negative

2

how are resting myocardial cells induced to contract

depolarization

3

is contraction simulatneous with depolarization

no, slightly behind

4

how long does the AV node pause conduction

1/10 of a second

5

after the SA node and the internodal pathways, where does the heart's conduction go to get to the Purkinje fibers

AV node to Bundle of His (AV bundle) to R and L BB then Purkinje fibers

6

what is the first downard stroke on an EKG considered

Q wave

7

if a Q wave (first downward stroke) is followed by an upstroke, what is that upstroke called

R wave

8

if there is an upward deflection in a QRS complex that appears before a Q wave, is it a Q wave

no

9

what is any downward stroke preceded by an upward stroke

S wave

10

if there is no upward stroke on the EKG, what is the lone downward stroke consdiered

QS wave

considered to be a Q wave when we look for Qs

11

is repolarization both a contractile and electrical event

electrical

12

on the ruled paper that we record ECGs on, what are the box sizes

1 mm by 1mm

13

how many 1 mm boxes are between each heavy black line on an ECG

5

14

how are height and depth of waves measured and what do they represent

in mm

voltage

15

if a wave of stimulation (depolarization) advances toward a positive electrode, what does this produce on the ECG

positive deflection

16

what is the depolarization on the ECG then

an advancing wave of positive charge in cells

17

what does a depolarization approaching a positive lead show on the ECG

positive deflection on ECG

18

what does each 1 mm box on the ECG represent horizontally

0.04 seconds

19

what does each demarcation of heavy black lines on the ECG represent

0.2 second

20

how many separate leads are there on a standard ECG

12: 6 chest and 6 separete limb leads

21

what are the limb leads

electrodes on right and left arms and left leg
aVR, aVL, aVF

22

what is the charge of the electrodes on the right arm

always negative

23

what is the charge of the electrodes on the left arm

one from the right arm is positive, one from the left leg is negative

24

what is the charge of the electrodes on the left leg

all positive

25

what lead goes from the right to left arm

lead I

26

what is the lead that goes from the right arm to the left leg

lead II

27

what is the lead that goes from the left arm to the left leg

lead III

28

what do aVR, aVL, and AVf represent

augmented voltage is compared from the right arm, left arm, and left foot to ground voltage

29

is aVR postiive or negative

positive

30

is aVR positive or negative

positive

31

is aVF positive or negative

positive

32

what are all the augmented leads considered in reference to charge

positive

33

what are the chset lead names

V1 to V6

34

how are the chest leads arranged and how is their charte

right to left side V1 to V6, they are all positive

35

where is the negative portion of the chest leads

on the back

36

what do the chest leads pass through to get to their negative counterparts on the backside

AV node

37

as you watch the progression from V1 to V6, which of the leads will be more positive normally

V6 side more positive than in V1 because ventricular depolarization is moving toward the positive electrode lead of V6

38

what are V1 and V2 over

right side of the heart

39

what are V5 and V6 over

left side of the heart

40

what are V3 and V4 over

Interventricular septum, common wall shared by the right and left ventricule where the AV bundle divides into the right and left bundle branches

41

what are the most important considerations for reading EKGs

rate
rhythm
axis
hypertrophy
infarction