DC US History Chapter 23 Flashcards


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1

In the late nineteenth century, those political candidates who campaigned by "waving the bloody shirt" were reminding voters...
a. of the "treason" of the Confederate Democrats during the Civil War.
b. that the Civil War had been caused by the election of a Republican president.
c. of the graft-filled "radical" regimes in the Reconstruction South.
d. that radical Republicans catered to freed slaves during Reconstruction.

a. of the "treason" of the Confederate Democrats during the Civil War.

2

Which one of the following is least related to the other three?
a. Jim Fisk
b. "Black Friday"
c. Jay Gould
d. "Ohio Idea"

d. "Ohio Idea"

3

One weapon that was used to put Boss Tweed, leader of New York City's infamous Tweed Ring, in jail was...
a. the pictures of political cartoonist Thomas Nast

b. bribes

c. the raising of tax assessment of his supporters

d. passage of an ethics law

a. the pictures of political cartoonist Thomas Nast

4

The Credit Mobilier scandal involved...
a. public utility company bribes.
b. Bureau of Indian Affairs payoffs.
c. railroad construction kickbacks.
d. evasion of excise taxes on distilled liquor.

c. railroad construction kickbacks.

5

In an attempt to avoid prosecution for their corrupt dealings. the owners of Credit Mobilizer...
a. left the country.
b. belatedly started to follow honest business practices.
c. sold controlling interest in the company to others.
d. tried to gain immunity by testifying before Congress.
e. distributed shares of the company's valuable stock to key congressmen.

e. distributed shares of the company's valuable stock to key congressmen.

6

President Ulysses S. Grant was reelected in 1872 because...
a. the Democrats and Liberal Republicans could not decide on a single candidate.
b. he promised reforms in the political system.
c. he pleaded for a clasping of hands across "the bloody chasm" between the North and South.
d. his opponents chose a poor candidate for the presidency.

d. his opponents chose a poor candidate for the presidency.

7

Match each politician below with the Republican political faction with which he was associated.

A. Roscoe Conkling 1. "Half-Breeds"
B. James Blaine 2. Stalwarts
C. Horace Greeley 3. Regular Republicans
D. Ulysses Grant 4. Liberal Republicans

a. A-2, B-3, C-4, D-l
b. A-3, B-1, C-2, D-4
c. A-1, B-2, C-3, D-4
d. A-2, B-1, C-4, D-3
e. A-4, B-3, C-1, D-2

d. A-2, B-1, C-4, D-3

8

One cause of the panic that broke in 1873 was...
a. the reissuance of millions of dollars in greenbacks.
b. the construction of more factories than existing markets would bear.
c. an extremely high rate of inflation.
d. the formation of the Greenback Labor party.
e. excessive speculation in mining stocks.

b. the construction of more factories than existing markets would bear.

9

As a solution to the panic or depression of 1873, debtors suggested...
a. a policy of deflation.
b. a passage of the Resumption Act of 1875.
c. stronger federal control of banking.
d. restoring the government's credit rating.
e. inflationary policies

e. inflationary policies

10

One result of Republican "hard money" policies was...

a. a strong dollar against foreign currencies.
b. damage to the country's credit rating.
c. the return to the "Dollar of Our Daddies," silver dollars, as the dominant coin in circulation.
d. the defeat of a Democratic House of Representatives in 1874.
e. the formation of the Greenback Labor party.

e. the formation of the Greenback Labor party.

11

Those who enjoyed a successful political career in the post-Civil War decades were usually...
a. reformers.
b. incorruptible.
c. party loyalists.
d. political independents.
e. wealthy and well educated

c. party loyalists.

12

During the Gilded Age, the Democrats and the Republicans...
a. had few significant economic differences.
b. agreed on currency policy but not the tariff.
c. were separated by substantial differences in economic policy.
d. held similar views on all economic issues except for civil service reform.
e. were divided over silver vs. gold currency.

a. had few significant economic differences.

13

The presidential elections of the 1870s and 1880s...
a. were all won by Republicans.
b. involved charismatic personalities.
c. were rarely close.
d. usually involved sharp partisan differences over issues like currency policy and civil-service reform.
e. aroused great interest among voters.

e. aroused great interest among voters.

14

One reason for the extremely high voter turnouts and partisan fervor of the Gilded Age was...
a. the parties' differences over economic issues.
b. sharp ethnic and cultural differences in the membership of the two parties.
c. battles between Catholics and Lutherans.
d. differences over the issue of the civil service.
e. sectional tensions between the Northeast and Midwest.

b. sharp ethnic and cultural differences in the membership of the two parties.

15

During the Gilded Age, the lifeblood of both the Democratic and the Republican parties was...
a. the Grand Army of the Republic.
b. the Roman Catholic Church.
c. ideological commitment.
d. big-city political machines.
e. political patronage.

e. political patronage.

16

"Spoilsmen" was the label attached to those who
a. expected government jobs from their party's elected officeholders...
b. ravaged the pristine environment of the "golden West" for their own profit.
c. manipulated railroad stocks to their own private advantage.
d. supported civil-service reform.
e. engaged in political corruption.

a. expected government jobs from their party's elected officeholders...

17

The major problem in the 1876 presidential election centered on...
a. who would be Speaker of the House.
b. the two sets of election returns submitted by Florida, South Carolina, and Louisiana.
c. Samuel Tilden's association with corrupt politicians.
d. President Grant's campaign for a third term.
e. failure to use the secret "Australian ballot" in some places.

b. the two sets of election returns submitted by Florida, South Carolina, and Louisiana.

18

The Compromise of 1877 resulted in...
a. a renewal of the Republican commitment to protect black civil rights in the South.
b. the withdrawal of federal troops from the South.
c. the election of a Democrat to the presidency.
d. passage of the Bland-Allison Silver Purchase Act.
e. a plan to build the first transcontinental railroad.

b. the withdrawal of federal troops from the South.

19

The sequence of presidential terms of the "forgettable presidents" of the Gilded Age (including Cleveland's two non-consecutive terms) was...
a. Cleveland, Hayes, Harrison, Cleveland, Arthur, Garfield.
b. Garfield, Hayes, Harrison, Cleveland, Arthur, Cleveland.
c. Cleveland, Garfield, Arthur, Hayes, Harrison, Cleveland.
d. Hayes, Garfield, Arthur, Cleveland, Harrison, Cleveland.
e. Hayes, Garfield, Harrison, Cleveland, Arthur, Cleveland.

d. Hayes, Garfield, Arthur, Cleveland, Harrison, Cleveland.

20

In the 1896 case of Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court ruled that...
a. African Americans could be denied the right to vote.
b. segregation was unconstitutional.
c. "separate but equal" facilities were constitutional.
d. the Fourteenth Amendment did not apply to African Americans.
e. literacy test. for voting were constitutional.

c. "separate but equal" facilities were constitutional.

21

One reason for the extremely high voter turnouts and partisan fervor of the Gilded Age was...
a. the parties' differences over economic issues.
b. sharp ethnic and cultural differences in the membership of the two parties.
c. battles between Catholics and Lutherans.
d. differences over the issue of the civil service.
e. sectional tensions between the Northeast and Midwest.

b. sharp ethnic and cultural differences in the membership of the two parties.

22

During the Gilded Age, the lifeblood of both the Democratic and the Republican parties was...
a. the Grand Army of the Republic.
b. the Roman Catholic Church.
c. ideological commitment.
d. big-city political machines.
e. political patronage.

e. political patronage.

23

"Spoilsmen" was the label attached to those who
a. expected government jobs from their party's elected officeholders...
b. ravaged the pristine environment of the "golden West" for their own profit.
c. manipulated railroad stocks to their own private advantage.
d. supported civil-service reform.
e. engaged in political corruption.

a. expected government jobs from their party's elected officeholders...

24

The major problem in the 1876 presidential election centered on...
a. who would be Speaker of the House.
b. the two sets of election returns submitted by Florida, South Carolina, and Louisiana.
c. Samuel Tilden's association with corrupt politicians.
d. President Grant's campaign for a third term.
e. failure to use the secret "Australian ballot" in some places.

b. the two sets of election returns submitted by Florida, South Carolina, and Louisiana.

25

The Compromise of 1877 resulted in...
a. a renewal of the Republican commitment to protect black civil rights in the South.
b. the withdrawal of federal troops from the South.
c. the election of a Democrat to the presidency.
d. passage of the Bland-Allison Silver Purchase Act.
e. a plan to build the first transcontinental railroad.

b. the withdrawal of federal troops from the South.

26

The sequence of presidential terms of the "forgettable presidents" of the Gilded Age (including Cleveland's two non-consecutive terms) was...
a. Cleveland, Hayes, Harrison, Cleveland, Arthur, Garfield.
b. Garfield, Hayes, Harrison, Cleveland, Arthur, Cleveland.
c. Cleveland, Garfield, Arthur, Hayes, Harrison, Cleveland.
d. Hayes, Garfield, Arthur, Cleveland, Harrison, Cleveland.
e. Hayes, Garfield, Harrison, Cleveland, Arthur, Cleveland.

d. Hayes, Garfield, Arthur, Cleveland, Harrison, Cleveland.

27

In the 1896 case of Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court ruled that...
a. African Americans could be denied the right to vote.
b. segregation was unconstitutional.
c. "separate but equal" facilities were constitutional.
d. the Fourteenth Amendment did not apply to African Americans.
e. literacy test. for voting were constitutional.

c. "separate but equal" facilities were constitutional.

28

At the end of Reconstruction, Southern whites disenfranchised African Americans with...
a. literacy requirements.
b. poll taxes.
c. economic intimidation.
d. grandfather clauses.
e. all of the above

e. all of the above

29

Abraham Lincoln was the first president to be assassinated while in office; the second was...
a. Rutherford Hayes.
b. William McKinley.
c. Chester Arthur.
d. Benjamin Harrison.
e. James Garfield.

E) James Garfield

30

President James A. Garfield was assassinated...
a. as a result of his service in the Civil War.
b. because he was a Stalwart Republican.
c. because he opposed civil-service reform.
d. by a deranged, disappointed office seeker.
e. by a political anarchist.

d. by a deranged, disappointed office seeker.

31

The Pendleton Act required appointees to public office to...
a. take a competitive examination.
b. present a written recommendation from a congressman or senator.
c. agree to make financial contributions to their political party.
d. pledge independence from either major political party.
e. have a college degree

a. take a competitive examination.

32

With the passage of the Pendleton Act, politicians now sought money from...
a. new immigrants.
b. civil-service workers.
c. the small army of factory workers whom they now had to mobilize.
d. foreign contributors.
e. big corporations

e. big corporations

33

The 1884 election contest between James G. Blaine and Grover Cleveland was noted for...
a. its emphasis on issues.
b. low voter turnout.
c. its personal attacks on the two candidates.
d. a landslide victory for the reform-minded Republicans.
e. its virtual tie in the electoral college.

c. its personal attacks on the two candidates.

34

Which one of the following Gilded Age presidents had a different party affiliation from the other four?
a. Ulysses S. Grant
b. Rutherford Hayes
c. Grover Cleveland
d. Benjamin Harrison
e. Chester Arthur

c. Grover Cleveland

35

When he was president, Grover Cleveland's hands-off approach to government gained the support of...
a. Civil War prisoners.
b. the Great Army of the Republic.
c. farmers.
d. workers.
e. businesspeople.

e. businesspeople.