BIO 169 Lab

Helpfulness: 0
Set Details Share
created 9 years ago by trulafaye
407 views
ELISA
updated 9 years ago by trulafaye
Grade levels:
College: First year, College: Second year
show moreless
Page to share:
Embed this setcancel
COPY
code changes based on your size selection
Size:
X
Show:
1

ELISA is

Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assay

2

What is ELISA used for?

used as an initial test for HIV detection. Also, influenza virus, bacterium that causes Lyme Disease, smallpox virus, SARS coronavirus, West Nile and others.

3

What are the two types of ELISA

Direct and Indirect

4

Indirect ELISA tests for?

patients blood for presence or absence of antibodies against a particular pathogen

5

What does the presence of antibodies indicate?

the individual has been infected and their body has produced an immune response.

6

Direct ELISA tests for?

the presence of antigens in the patients blood

7

What is ELISA based on?

the principle that antibodies produced in response to pathogens attach to their antigen targets specifically to form antigen-antibody complexes

8

Steps of ELISA

1. antigen proteins purified from the infectious agent have been added to and been bound to the bottom of the wells
2. Blood serum from each patient is added to the treated wells. If the serum contains antibodies against the bound antigen the antibodies will attach, forming tight complexes
3. Wells are washed between each step to remove any unbound proteins (visualization is the next step).
4. A second antibody is added that recognizes antibodies produced by humans
5. Chromogen substrate added to well. If present, the enzyme will facilitate a chemical reaction that changes the color of the chromogen
6. Color change indicates patient has been infected.

9

The catabolic process that breaks down large food molecules to monomers?

Chemical Digestion

10

Catabolic means?

Break down of substances into simplier forms

11

Monomers are?

chemical building blocks

12

Hydrolysis is?

breakdown of any food molecule by enzymes

13

Hyrolysis means?

Hydro - water
lysis - broken

14

Common Carbohydrates in our diet are

glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, lactose, maltose, glycogen and starch

15

the intestines can only absorb what type of carbohydrate

monosaccharides

16

What form are most carbohydrates in?

starch

17

enzyme in sylvia that spilts starch into oligosaccharides?

Salivary amylase

18

What environment does amylase work best in?

slightly acidic to neutral

19

Stomach acid inactivates?

Amylase

20

Pancreatic amylase released by the pancreas into the small intestines finishes?

Starch digestion

21

What are the most important brush border enzymes?

dextrinase and glucoamylase

22

Lactose intolerant is

the inability to digest milk sugar

23

Monomers of protein are:

amino acids

24

Are we actually cannibals?

No, carnivores

25

Where does protein digestion begin?

Stomach

26

Pepsinogen is activated to form what protein digesting enzyme in the stomach?

pepsin

27

What environment does pepsin work best in?
Acidic or basic?

acidic

28

What five enzymes in the small intestines continues protein digestion?

trypsin, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase, aminopeptidase and dipeptidase.

29

What are the most abundant fats in the diet?

Triglycerides

30

Primary site for fat digestion is

small intestine

31

what fat digesting enzyme does the pancreas produce?

lipases

32

The detergent (soap) like material allows the fat to mix with the watery environment of the body?

bile salts

33

An emulsion is?

an aqueous suspension of fatty droplets

34

Pancreatic lipases cleave off two fatty acid chains, yeilding free:

fatty acids and monoglycerides