Chapter 10 - Midterm Review - Pathophysiology 370

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Pathophysiology
Chapter 10
Hypersensitivity
updated 5 months ago by acemeister123
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1

Type of hypersensitivity where the immune system attacks the body's own antigens

Type II

2

Type of hypersensitivity where the damage is due to T cells and macrophages attacking the target

Type IV

3

Type of hypersensitivity due to antigen-antibody complexes that deposit in blood vessels

Type III

4

Type of hypersensitivity that involves IgE and mast cell degranulation

Type I

5

Type of hypersensitivity that does not involve antibodies

Type IV

6

Type of hypersensitivity that can cause anaphylactic shock

Type I

7

Which type of hypersensitivity reaction is NOT involved in autoimmunity?

Type I

8

Which two types of hypersensitivity reaction are involved in lupus (SLE)?

Type II

Type III

9

What type of cell largely responsible for type I hypersensitivity responses?

mast cell

10

Which one of the following is not an example of a type IV hypersensitivity?

  1. latex allergy
  2. Contact dermatitis (e.g., contact with poison ivy)
  3. a positive tuberculin skin test
  4. hemolytic disease of the newborn

hemolytic disease of the newborn

11

What is an example of a systemic autoimmune disease?

myasthenia gravis

12

What is a common treatment for type III hypersensitivity reactions?

anti-inflammatory steroid treatments

13

What is an immune complex is an aggregate of?

antibody and antigen molecules

14

Type I hypersensitivities require what initial priming event to occur?

sensitization

15

What is the main mediator/initiator of type II hypersensitivity reactions?

antibodies

16

Inflammatory molecules are released by mast cells in type I hypersensitivities; type II hypersensitivities, however, are characterized by what?

cell lysis (cytotoxicity)