Control of microbial growth

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basic concepts from microbiology text book
updated 5 weeks ago by jjamiso1
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1

Sterilization

Removal of all microorganisms including endospores and viruses

2

Disinfection

Elimination of most or all pathogens although some viable microbes may remain

3

Disinfectants

Used on all inanimate objects and also known as biocides, germicides, and bactericides

4

Anticeptics

Used on living tissue

5

Pasteurization

Brief heating to reduce number of spoilage organisms, and destroys pathogens. This method is used on foods and inanimate objects.

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Decontamination

Method used to reduce pathogens to level considered safe to handle.

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Sanitized

Substantially reduce microbial population that meets accepted health standards.

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Preservation

A process of delaying spoilage of foods and other perishable products by adjusting conditions or adding bacteriostatic preservations.

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How to control microbial growth in your daily life

Wash your hands with soap and water routinely

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How to control microbial growth in a healthcare setting

Instruments must be sterilized to avoid infection in the deep tissue

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How to control microbial growth in microbiology laboratory

Use rigorous methods of control to eliminate contamination to both experimental samples and the environment by using sterile media and sterilize culture; use antiseptic techniques and follow CDC guidelines for labs working with microbes BSL1-4

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How to control microbial growth in food and food production facilities

Heat treatment is the most common, irradiation, chemical additives that are FDA approved

13

Water treatment facilites

Regulations require facilities to minimize DBP's and C. parvum in treated water.

14

Why should you consider environmental conditions when selecting an antimicrobial procedure?

Some environmental conditions like dirt, grease and body fluids can interfere with heat penetration or an action of a chemical.

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Moist heat

Irreversibly denatures proteins. It is safe, effective, and inexpensive. It does not sterilize; endospores can survive.

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Pasteurization

A form of moist heat that destroys heat-sensitive pathogens and spoilage organisms. High-temp for short time like milk 72 degree for 15 seconds or ultra high heat for a few seconds.

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Why should you consider the type and the number of microbes when selecting an antimicrobial procedure?

the size of the population will determine the amount of time for heat or the amount of time you leave chemicals on infected item for it to be effective. The larger the population the longer the time. Also there are many microbes that are highly resistant to disinfectants.

18

Autoclave

A form of moist heat that is used to sterilize using pressurized steam. This method is used in the commercial canning process with an industrial size autoclave called a retort. designed to destroy clostridium botulinum endospores.

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Dry heat

Less effective than moist heat; longer times with higher temperatures are necessary to be effective. Hot air ovens denature proteins and is used on glass, powders, oils and other dry materials. Incineration is used on medical waste and animal carcasses.

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Filtration

Used on materials that cannot withstand heat treatment. Filtration of air uses high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters remove nearly all microbes from air

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Radiation

Electromagnetic radiation-High frequency (low wavelength) has more energy then low frequency.

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Ionizing radiation

Removes electrons from atoms