The Hobbit

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1

Let's have no more argument. I have chosen Mr. Baggins and that ought to be enough for all of you. If I say he is a Burglar, a Burglar he is, or will be when the time comes. There is a lot more in him than you guess, and a deal more than he has any idea of himself. You may (possibly) all live to thank me yet. -Gandalf 13

Tolkein, J.R.R. The Hobbit. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973. Print

2

Naturally the dwarves accepted the offer eagerly. Already they had come to respect little Bilbo. Now he had become the real leader in their adventure. He had begun to have ideas and plans of his own 214

Tolkein, J.R.R. The Hobbit. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973. Print

3

It was a terrible battle. The most dreadful of all Bilbo's experiences, and the one which at the time he hated most – which is to day it was the one he was most proud of, and most fond of recalling long afterwards, although he was quite unimportant in it.

Tolkein, J.R.R. The Hobbit. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973. Print

4

Bilbo knew it. He had read a good many things he had never seen or done. He was very much alarmed, as well as disgusted; he wished himself a hundred miles away, and yet – and yet somehow he could not go straight back to Thorin and Company emptyhanded. 24

Tolkein, J.R.R. The Hobbit. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973. Print

5

He knew, of course, that the riddle-game was sacred and of immense antiquity, and even wicked creatures were afraid to cheat when they played at it. But he felt he could not trust this slimy thing Gollum to keep any promise at a pinch

Tolkein, J.R.R. The Hobbit. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973. Print

6

For Thorin had taken heart again hearing how the hobbit had rescued his companions from the spiders, and was determined once more not to ransom himself with promises to the king of a share in the treasure, until all hope of escaping in any other way had disappeared; until in fact the remarkable Mr. Invisible Baggins

Tolkein, J.R.R. The Hobbit. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973. Print

7

Whenever Smaug's roving eye, seeking for him in the shadows, flashed across him, he trembled, and an unaccountable desire seized hold of him to rush out and reveal himself and tell all the truth to Smaug. In fact he was in grievous danger of coming under the dragon-spell.

Tolkein, J.R.R. The Hobbit. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973. Print

8

What has roots as nobody sees,
Is taller than trees,
Up, up it goes,
And yet never grows?

Tolkein, J.R.R. The Hobbit. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973. Print

9

Never laugh at live dragons, Bilbo you fool!” he said to himself, and it became a favourite saying of his later, and passed into a proverb

Tolkein, J.R.R. The Hobbit. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973. Print

10

There is more in you of good than you know, child of the kindly West. Some courage and some wisdom, blended in measure. If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world

Tolkein, J.R.R. The Hobbit. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973. Print