Class 6: Satir FT

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1

broad goals of Satir

  • Broadly characterized by infusing humanistic values into a systemic approach

Focus on fostering individual growth and improving family interactions

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Interventions

  • Sculpting
  • Metaphors
  • Ingredients of an interaction
  • family reconstruction
  • parts party
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Making contact

  • intervention

connections within therapists and between therapist and client. Attending skills, shaking hands, asking for name preferences, etc

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Ingredients of an interaction

  • intervention
  • What do I hear and see?
  • What meanings do I make of what I hear and see?
  • What feelings do I have about the meanings I make?
  • What feelings do I have about these feelings?
  • What defenses do I use?
  • What rules for commenting do I use?
  • What is my response in the situation?
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  • Family reconstruction
  • intervention
  • ID roots of old learning and their role in the present. Develop more realistic picture of client’s parents, discover unique strengths and potentials
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  • Parts party
  • Client IDs group members to represent aspects of self. Client is better able to accept different aspects of the self and to identify the contexts in which these aspects have been/ continue to be useful
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Therapeutic presence

  • Coaching
  • Self-of-the-therapist
  • Establishing credibility
  • Conveying hope
  • Empathy’
  • Making contact
  • Warmth and humanity as a therapeutic presence
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Basic beliefs of Satir FT

  • communication stances- we want to be congruent
  • survival stances
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Communication stances

  • offers clinician of any theoretical orientation an effective/ effective means of conceptualizing how best to communicate and interact with a client.
  • Ideally we want to be congruent, which is easy to achieve when we feel secure but not so easy to achieve when we feel threatened or in conflict
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Congruent communication

  • Goal of Satir
  • Balance of self and others while responding appropriate within and acknowledging the context
  • Most are congruent when we feel secure
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Survival stances

  • 4 types: placator, blamer , superreasonable , and irrelevant
  • Each style acknowledges or minimizes three basic realities: self, other, context
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placator

  • survival stance
  • Minimizes the self
  • People pleasing tendency
  • Therapists should be less directive
  • Rapport has not been established until the placatory disagrees with the therapist
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Blaming

  • survival stance
  • Minimizes others
  • Therapists should work with these individuals by addressing their expectations
  • Goal: increase awareness of others’ thoughts and feeling and help learn how to communicate respectfully
  • Generally prefer direct therapists and communication
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superreasonable

  • survival stance
  • Minimizes self and others
  • Logic and rules reign as supreme; tend to avoid all emotions
  • Therapists should start by engaging them in bodily reactions before addressing feelings
  • Goal: help clients value internal, subjective realities of self and others
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irrelevant

  • survival stance
  • Minimizes self, others, context
  • There is no consistent grounding self, or context for therapist to use in understanding or communicating with client
  • Therapist should spend time “floating” with client’s distractions and identify their “anchors”
  • Bodily sensations work well. These can eventually be used to help bring awareness to feelings of self and others and the demands of the context
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Model of change

  • usually goes through this process multiple times
  • Status quo: state of homeostasis that includes at least one symptomatic member
  • Intro of foreign element: can bea life crisis, tragedy, or therapeutic intervention gets the system off balance
  • Chaos: the new perspective creates positive feedback loop that throws the system into a state of chaos; the “natural” response is to feel uncomfortable and in most all cases the family tried to regain the status quo, which may not even be possible
  • Integration of new possibilities: the family interprets the new info in a meaningful way; therapist needs to be respectful of how the system uses the information and responds to therapist-client interactions, honoring the system’s autonomy
  • Practice: system develops new set of interaction patterns based on this new info. This may or not be what the therapist expects but the therapists asks two evaluative questions: are the symptoms improving? And is each person able to self actualize and grow?
  • New status quo: new state of homeostatic doesn’t include symptomatic member and that allows all members to grow and flourish
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status quo

  • state of homeostasis that includes at least one symptomatic member
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foregin element

  • : can be a life crisis, tragedy, or therapeutic intervention gets the system off balance
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Chaos

  • the new perspective creates positive feedback loop that throws the system into a state of chaos; the “natural” response is to feel uncomfortable and in most all cases the family tried to regain the status quo, which may not even be possible
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. Integration of new possibilities

  • the family interprets the new info in a meaningful way; therapist needs to be respectful of how the system uses the information and responds to therapist-client interactions, honoring the system’s autonomy
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Practice

  • system develops new set of interaction patterns based on this new info.
  • This may or not be what the therapist expects but the therapists asks two evaluative questions: are the symptoms improving? And is each person able to self actualize and grow?
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. New status quo

new state of homeostatic doesn’t include symptomatic member and that allows all members to grow and flourish

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Assessing individual and family functioning

  • Role of the symptom in system
  • Family dynamics
    • Power struggles, parental conflicts, lack of validation, lack of intimacy
  • Family roles
    • Martyr, victim, rescuer, good child/ parent, bad child/ parent
  • Family life chronology: key historical events

Survival triad: emotional and nurturing relationships between children and parents

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  • Family roles
  • Martyr, victim, rescuer, good child/ parent, bad child/ parent
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Survival triad

emotional and nurturing relationships between children and parents

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  • Assessing individual functioning
  • Survival stances
  • 6 levels of experience (the iceberg)
  • Self worth and self esteem
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  • 6 levels of experience (the iceberg)
  • For symptomatic behavior
  • Behavior, coping, feelings, perceptions, expectations, yearnings