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Chapter 22: Respiratory System (Mastering)

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1

Once released, renin functions to enzymatically split (cleave) circulating angiotensinogen into angiotensin I. Where is angiotensinogen made?

in the heart

in the liver

in the kidney

in the lung

in the liver

2

During inhalation,

the diaphragm relaxes.

oxygen molecules move into the lungs, and carbon dioxide molecules move out of the lungs.

air moves up the trachea.

the volume of the thoracic cavity decreases.

the diaphragm and rib muscles contract.

the diaphragm and rib muscles contract.

3

From which structures do oxygen molecules move from the lungs to the blood?

Alveoli

Bronchi

Nose

Bronchioles

Trachea

Alveoli

4

Which statement is correct?

As oxygen diffuses from the lungs into capillaries, blood becomes deoxygenated.

Oxygen is released from the mitochondria as a product of cellular respiration.

Oxygen diffuses from large blood vessels into the body's cells.

Carbon dioxide diffuses from the alveoli into surrounding capillaries.

In the blood, oxygen is bound to hemoglobin, a protein found in red blood cells.

In the blood, oxygen is bound to hemoglobin, a protein found in red blood cells.

5

After blood becomes oxygenated,

it returns to the heart, and is then pumped to body cells.

it does not return to the heart, but goes directly to the lungs.

it does not return to the heart, but goes directly to capillaries that supply the body's cells with oxygen.

it returns to the heart, and is then pumped to the lungs.

it does not return to the heart, but goes to the nose and mouth.

it returns to the heart, and is then pumped to body cells.

6

Hemoglobin

uses ATP to move oxygen from blood to body cells.

is a protein that can bind four molecules of oxygen.

has five subunits.

is the site of cellular respiration.

is found in blood plasma.

is a protein that can bind four molecules of oxygen

7

Art-based Question

BioFlix Activity: Gas Exchange -- Inhaling and ExhalingInhalation and exhalation are facilitated by the work of your diaphragm and rib muscles.

To review these processes, watch this BioFlix animation: Gas Exchange: Mechanics of Breathing.

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A: Inhalation

B: Exhalation

C: External Intercostal Muscles Contract

D: Air Enters Body

E: Air Leaves Body

F: Internal Intercostal Muscles Contract

H: Diaphragm Relaxes (Moves Up)

G: Diaphragm Contracts (Moves Down)

8

Which of the following pressures must remain negative to prevent lung collapse?

atmospheric pressure

intrapulmonary pressure

transpulmonary pressure

intrapleural pressure

intrapleural pressure

9

__________ pressure, the difference between the intrapulmonary and intrapleural pressures, prevents the lungs from collapsing.

Transthoracic

Transpulmonary

Atmospheric

Intra-alveolar

Transpulmonary

10

According to this spirographic record, what is the total volume of exchangeable air for a normal male?

2400 milliliters

3600 milliliters

4800 milliliters

6000 milliliters

4800 milliliters

11

Which volumes are combined to provide the inspiratory capacity?

expiratory reserve volume (ERV) and residual volume (RV)

tidal volume (TV), inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), expiratory reserve volume (ERV), and residual volume (RV)

tidal volume (TV) and inspiratory reserve volume (IRV)

tidal volume (TV), inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), and expiratory reserve volume (ERV)

tidal volume (TV) and inspiratory reserve volume (IRV)

12

Which of the following findings consistently matches pulmonary function with problems with ventilation?

A person with a decreased FVC and FEV1 has an obstructive disorder.

A person with a FEV1 below 80% has a restrictive disorder.

A person with decreased FVC and increased FEV1 has an obstructive disorder.

A person with a decreased FVC and a normal FEV1 has a restrictive disorder.

A person with a decreased FVC and a normal FEV1 has a restrictive disorder.

13

Which of the following would induce the loss of oxygen from the hemoglobin and the blood?

a drop in blood pH

increase in hemoglobin that has oxygen bound to it already

decreases in plasma carbon dioxide

a decrease in blood temperature

a drop in blood pH

14

What is the most common method of carbon dioxide transport?

as bicarbonate ions in the plasma

chemically bound to hemoglobin as oxyhemoglobin

chemically bound to hemoglobin as carbaminohemoglobin

dissolved in the plasma

as bicarbonate ions in the plasma

15

Which of the following best describes the chloride shift as seen in the figure?

Chloride is removed from hemoglobin when carbon dioxide binds to it.

Chloride binds bicarbonate and allows more of it to be carried in the bloodstream.

Chloride rushes into RBCs to counterbalance the outflow of bicarbonate.

Chloride is taken out of the blood to counterbalance the inflow of carbon dioxide.

Chloride rushes into RBCs to counterbalance the outflow of bicarbonate.

16

Which form of CO2 transport accounts for the least amount of CO2 transported in blood?

chemically bound to hemoglobin

as bicarbonate ion in plasma

dissolved in plasma

as carbon monoxide in plasma

dissolved in plasma

17

Which of the following is the primary factor in oxygen's attachment to, or release from, hemoglobin?

temperature

partial pressure of oxygen

partial pressure of carbon dioxide

blood pH

partial pressure of oxygen

18

What is the primary form in which oxygen is carried in blood?

chemically bound to hemoglobin

as a bicarbonate ion in plasma

as carbonic acid in plasma

dissolved in plasma

chemically bound to hemoglobin